Graduate School Opportunities

Graduate School Opportunities Listings will be kept for a month after being posted or until their deadline (if listed). I do not post positions that require a masters degree, as this site is aimed at undergraduates. Please send any opportunities not listed here by clicking on this link:

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Master's Program - NE Spotted Skunk Survey

I am looking for a Master's student to conduct a spotted skunk survey in the state of Nebraska. This project is funded by Nebraska Game and Parks and includes money for supplies, some travel costs, and a student research assistantship for one year (with the possibility of an additional semester of research assistantship). Students would have financial support for a total of 2 years (4 semesters) and any semesters that are not supported through the grant's research assistantship will be in the form of a teaching assistantship.

This trapping effort will allow us to find localized populations that have remained largely unknown to biologists for decades. These data will inform Nebraska's Heritage Program ranking of this species and will provide a foundation for the next step in conserving this species. The student who does this project will be expected to drive to field sites to place trail cameras and track plates and to check these in a timely manner. This will require extensive driving to field sites and potentially working alone (although undergraduate, and Game and Parks help is possible). Camera and track plate sampling will take place across one year in several locations around the state.

OBJECTIVES
1. Deploy 30 camera traps and 20 track plates throughout the state
2. Map habitat parameters within one (1) mile of camera traps and track plates.
3. Develop a habitat suitability model and/or landscape feature analysis of spotted skunks and other species captured by the cameras and track plates.

For additional information please contact Dr. James A. Wilson, Department of Biology, University of Nebraska at Omaha (jameswilson@unomaha.edu). Students interested in this Master's program should visit the prospective graduate studies website:

https://www.unomaha.edu/college-of-arts-and-sciences/biology/academics/graduate-program/prospective-students.php

Be aware that the application deadline for Summer 2021 or Fall 2021 is February 15, 2021.

Posted 1/16/21

MS Graduate Research Assistantship on Fish and Wildlife Trade in the Brazilian Amazon

Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Start date: August 2021 (preferred) or January 2022
Applications will be considered as received

Description:

Graduate Research Assistant sought to complete a master's degree at Virginia Tech in a project on fish and wildlife trade in the Amazon. The study will be focused on the human dimensions of conservation and will involve designing qualitative and quantitative research, data collection (interviews with residents of rural and urban areas), analyses, and writing. The student is expected to return the results of the study to stakeholders in the region, including research participants. The student will receive a master's degree in Fish and Wildlife Conservation from Virginia Tech and work with Willandia Chaves (https://fishwild.vt.edu/faculty/chaves.html).

Minimum qualifications:
·         Undergraduate degree in human dimensions, fisheries, wildlife, natural resources, environmental social sciences, or related discipline
·         Interest in social science research
·         Excellent writing skills
·         Ability to work independently and as part of a team
·         Ability to communicate well in Portuguese
Preferred qualifications:
·         Demonstrated research experience (data collection, analysis, and writing)
·         Experience with survey and/or interview research
·         Experience working in the Amazon a plus

Interested candidates should submit the following documents (as a single pdf file): 1) Cover letter summarizing interest in the position, qualifications, experience, and research and career goals; 2) CV or resume; 3) Academic transcripts (unofficial is fine at this stage); 4) Names, positions, and contact information for three professional references, and a short description of your relationship with each.

Submit application materials via email to Willandia Chaves (wchaves@vt.edu) with “GRA Application for Research in the Amazon” in the email subject line. Questions may also be sent to this email. For full consideration, applications should be submitted by February 15, 2021, and will be reviewed as they are received.

Following this process, the top candidate will need to apply to the Virginia Tech Graduate School before acceptance. If the selected candidate is an international student, they will need to take the TOEFL or IELTS (see Graduate School testing requirements). The position will be supported by a combination of Graduate Research and Teaching Assistantships. Virginia Tech is an equal opportunity employer.

Posted 1/16/21

MS Graduate Research Assistantship on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in Nature-related Recreation

Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA
Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation
Start date: August 2021
Applications will be considered as received

Description:

Graduate Research Assistant sought to complete a master's degree at Virginia Tech in a project on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion in nature-related activities (e.g., fishing, hiking, wildlife viewing) in the United States. The study will be focused on understanding factors that constrain or encourage the engagement of underrepresented groups in nature-related activities. The student will be involved in designing qualitative and quantitative research, data collection (interviews with residents of rural and urban areas), analyses, and writing. The student is expected to return the results of the study to stakeholders, including research participants. The student will receive a master's degree in Fish and Wildlife Conservation from Virginia Tech and work with Willandia Chaves (https://fishwild.vt.edu/faculty/chaves.html).

Minimum qualifications:
·         Undergraduate degree in human dimensions, fisheries, wildlife, natural resources, environmental social sciences, or related discipline
·         Interest in social science research
·         Interest in research in Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
·         Excellent writing skills
·         Works well independently and as part of a team

Preferred qualifications:
·         Demonstrated research experience (data collection, analysis, and writing)
·         Experience with research using surveys and/or interviews

Interested candidates should submit the following documents (as a single pdf file): 1) Cover letter summarizing interest in the position, qualifications, experience, and research and career goals; 2) CV or resume; 3) Academic transcripts (unofficial is fine at this stage); 4) Names, positions, and contact information for three professional references, and a short description of your relationship with each.

Submit application materials via email to Willandia Chaves (wchaves@vt.edu) with “GRA Application – DEI Research” in the email subject line. For full consideration, applications should be submitted by February 15, 2021, and will be reviewed as they are received.

Following this process, the top candidate will need to apply to the Virginia Tech Graduate School before acceptance. The position will be supported by a combination of Graduate Research and Teaching Assistantships. Virginia Tech is an equal opportunity employer.

Posted 1/16/21

MS Opportunity in Conservation Genomics at Indiana University of Pennsylvania

The Emel lab https://sarahemel.weebly.com/ is seeking a motivated master's student to take part in funded research on Appalachian cottontail conservation genomics at Indiana University of Pennsylvania (IUP). A 2-year Research Assistantship to cover tuition and stipend is available. This position starts in Fall 2021 in Indiana, PA, with an opportunity for related remote or on-campus employment in Summer 2021.

Appalachian cottontails have specific forested habitat requirements and are restricted to ridgetops in the Appalachian mountains, making them susceptible to changes in human land use patterns and other disturbances. In collaboration with the labs of Jeff Larkin and Joe Duchamp at IUP, this interdisciplinary project aims to determine the current status of this species, along with snowshoe hare, in the state of Pennsylvania, and to evaluate the genetic and ecological responses to landscape change and management practices. To study patterns of genetic diversity and gene flow across the landscape, the Emel lab is developing genomic tools for high-throughput species identification and SNP genotyping of native Lagomorphs.

The master's student will be instrumental in developing and applying these genomic tools to assess genetic structure and diversity. As a result, they will gain experience in the molecular laboratory methods, bioinformatics, and analysis of genomic data, with potential extensions depending on research interests. There will also be fieldwork opportunities if desired.

The IUP MS in Biology https://www.iup.edu/biology/grad/ offers coursework in molecular genetics, statistics, ecology, evolutionary biology, and special topics including landscape/conservation genetics. Graduates of the program go on to top PhD programs, state and federal agencies, non-governmental conservation organizations, and industry.

Desired qualifications: Bachelor's degree in Biology, Computer Science, or a related field. Coursework in genetics, ecology, and evolutionary biology. Ability to work both independently and collaboratively. Strong written and oral communication skills and coursework in statistics and computer science preferred. Applicants with bioinformatic or coding experience in any language (R, python, bash, etc.) are especially encouraged to apply.

Interested candidates should email the following materials to Dr. Sarah Emel (semel@iup.edu). Review begins February 8; applications accepted until position filled:
1) Subject line reading "Emel Lab Graduate Position"
2) Brief description of your research interests and relevant experience
3) CV or resume
4) Unofficial undergraduate transcript
5) Contact information for 3 references

Informal inquiries are also welcome. The IUP Biology graduate program has rolling admissions, and top candidates will be instructed to apply.

Posted 1/15/21

Biology MS Graduate Assistantship opening for Fall 2021 - Plant Ecology - Minnesota State University, Mankato

The Kaproth Lab is looking for an exceptional MS graduate student to work on oak/prairie functional traits or conservation projects starting in the Fall (possibly Summer) of 2021. https://cset.mnsu.edu/departments/biological-sciences/faculty-and-staff/matthew-kaproth/matthew-kaproths-research/

The position includes a full tuition waiver and Teaching Assistantship stipend (additional summer Research Assistantships are possible if working on herbarium curation or funded projects). The academic portion of the degree will take place at Minnesota State University, Mankato. https://cset.mnsu.edu/departments/biological-sciences/graduate-programs/

The candidate must be *highly motivated* and have a strong interest in plant ecology (projects can include investigations in evolution and ecophysiology using GIS, statistics/analysis, and biodiversity surveys). Projects have potential to fit within model systems in the evolution of stress tolerance developed with a group of collaborators across the Americas and Europe. The research may be conducted as models, at regional field sites and/or in the greenhouse/lab. Research could require that the Graduate Assistant coordinates undergraduate student assistants, and that they can drive/work in adverse (hot) conditions.

Caveat: I don't expect the candidate to know exactly what project they would want to research going in, but they should be driven to investigate ecological or plant systematics/conservation questions.

To apply, email Dr. Matthew Kaproth by February 15th with the following:
1. A letter of interest that tells me about your research interests, background, types of questions you are interested in, etc.;
2. An unofficial university transcript (your undergraduate GPA should be >3.0);
3. Outstanding communication and writing skills;
4. Your CV with the names and contact information for three references;
5. Anything else that you think makes you uniquely qualified for the position.

Here's a part of what I can contribute:
1. Attentive mentorship and career development;
2. Training in plant systematics, biostatistics, plant biology/ecology, ecophysiology and experimental design;
3. Teaching opportunities (TA with stipend and tuition waiver);
4. Summer and supplemental Research Assistantship support during school breaks may be possible - but is not promised (projects would need to be funded or base on herbarium curation);
5. Contacts in academia and with regional partners (Dept. of Natural Resources, the University of Minnesota, The Prairie Enthusiasts, Morton Arboretum, etc.);
6. An ally and an environment that encourages a healthy work-life balance.

Matthew Kaproth, PhD (he/him/his)
Associate Professor
Minnesota State University, Mankato
Dept. of Biological Sciences
https://cset.mnsu.edu/departments/biological-sciences/faculty-and-staff/matthew-kaproth/

Posted 1/14/21

PhD position in Stream Ecosystem Ecology

PhD position in Stream Ecosystem Ecology
Division of Biology
Kansas State University

Research focus: I am seeking highly a motivated student for a project involving biogeochemistry, hydrology, and stream metabolic activity. The student will be responsible for maintaining hydrologic sensors at Konza Prairie Biological station and additional chemical sensors in the region. They will link data from Konza, the National Ecological Observatory Network domain 6, and a regional sensor array network. Ecological modeling will be employed to analyze the data. For more information contact Walter Dodds wkdodds@ksu.edu and visit http://www.k-state.edu/doddslab/

More information on KSU Biology and application procedures is here (https://www.k-state.edu/biology/grad/) and affiliation with the graduate program through the Konza LTER here: http://lter.konza.ksu.edu/how-join-us, http://lter.konza.ksu.edu/graduate-research, http://lter.konza.ksu.edu/konza-prairie-lter-featured-graduate-students

Starting and Closing date: Prefer start of Summer 2021, but could wait till fall 2021. Applications will be considered as submitted, final decision by or before 15 April 2021.

Kansas State University is an Equal Opportunity Employer of individuals with disabilities and protected veterans and actively seeks diversity among its employees.

Posted 1/14/21

Two M.S. assistantships in Plant Ecology at Oklahoma State University

Zhai Lab in the Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, is looking for two highly motivated students to join ongoing projects in our lab, including species invasion and forest production dynamics under climate change and management. Our lab is interested in understanding plant dynamics by integrating multiple approaches: statistical- and process-based vegetation model, stable isotope analysis, functional trait analysis, and remote sensing.

Application details:

1. Salary/Benefit: A graduate stipend of $18,900 annually, tuition waiver, and health insurance at $20 per month (for student only, family coverage available for an additional fee).

2. Starting Date: summer or fall 2021 (summer and fall semester begins in June and August, respectively).

3. Application date: Applications will be considered on a rolling basis until the position is filled.

4. Qualifications: Applicants should have: (1) A B.S. in natural resources (forestry, rangeland, or agriculture), ecology, botany, geography, or a related field; (2) An undergraduate GPA of 3.0 or higher. Desired qualifications include: (1) Experience or coursework in statistical analysis or greenhouse experiment; (2) Interest in plant ecology; (2) Willingness to learn computer programming skills. Previous programming and quantitative analysis background are very helpful.

5. Application: Applicants must create a single PDF with the name containing the first and last name of applicant. Send the PDF to Dr. Lu Zhai (lu.zhai@okstate.edu). The PDF must contain: (1) A 1 or 2-page letter of interest stating motivation to pursue an M.S. degree and research experiences and interests; (2) Curriculum Vitae including GPA, GRE, names and emails for three references, and TOEFL/IELTS scores (international students only); (3) Unofficial transcripts

6. Location and facilities: Oklahoma State University is classified as R1: Doctoral Universities - Very high research activity in the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education. The university is a land grant institution with an enrollment of about 25,000 students located midway between Tulsa and Oklahoma City. The department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management conducts interdisciplinary research, instruction, and extension education to address the sustainable management and conservation of the forest, rangeland, fishery, and wildlife resources.

Posted 1/14/21

Doherty Research Assistantships in Aquatic Ecology

PhD. Research Assistantships in Aquatic Ecology

The Resetarits Lab (http://www.olemiss.edu/resetaritslab/) at The University of Mississippi anticipates 2-3 openings for Fall 2021 for highly qualified PhD. students as Doherty Research Assistants in Freshwater Biology. These are 12 month Research Assistantships in the Department of Biology and the Center for Water and Wetlands Resources, providing full 5 years of support. Current stipend is 28-30k/year, with health insurance, and full tuition remission. Recipients are expected to design and implement independent dissertation projects (empirical and/or theoretical) at the interface between community, behavioral, and evolutionary ecology in freshwater systems, or at the freshwater/terrestrial interface, as well as participate in ongoing lab projects. Current studies in the Lab address a variety of questions, including the role of habitat selection in the assembly of communities and the dynamics of metacommunities, the role of diversity and species interactions in community assembly/ecosystem function, life history evolution in amphibians and insects, and biochemical, behavioral, evolution and community dynamics of chemical camouflage. Study organisms include amphibians, aquatic insects, other aquatic invertebrates, and fish, while focal habitats range from small ephemeral ponds to headwater mountain streams. Funding for past and ongoing research has come primarily from the National Science Foundation, along with EPA/NASA, and the Henry L. and Grace Doherty Charitable Foundation.

Profile and Recent/representative papers: * indicate grad students
https://scholar.google.com/citations?hl=en&user=pQIuz3wAAAAJ&view_op=list_works&sortby=pubdate
McNamara, S. C*., M. R. Pintar & W. J. Resetarits, Jr. 2021. Temperature but not nutrient addition affects abundance and assemblage structure of colonizing aquatic insects. Ecology 102:e03209.
Resetarits, W. J. Jr., *M. R. Pintar,* J. R. Bohenek, &* T. M. Breech. 2019. Patch size as a niche dimension: aquatic insects behaviorally partition enemy-free space across gradients of patch size. The American Naturalist. 194:776-793.
*Bohenek, J. R. & W. J. Resetarits, Jr. 2018. Are direct density cues, not resource competition, driving life history trajectories in a polyphenic salamander? Evolutionary Ecology 32:335-357.
*Pintar, M. R.,* J. R. Bohenek, *L. Eveland, & W. J. Resetarits, Jr. 2018. Colonization across gradients of risk and reward: nutrients and predator density generate species-specific responses among aquatic insects. Functional Ecology 32:1589-1598. DOI:10.1111/1365-2435.13086
Resetarits, W. J. Jr., *J. R. Bohenek, *M. R. Pintar & *T. M. Breech. 2018. Predation risk and patch size jointly determine perceived patch quality in ovipositing treefrogs, Hyla chrysoscelis. Ecology 99:661-669.
*Pintar, M. R. & W. J. Resetarits, Jr. 2017. Prey-driven control of predator assemblages: zooplankton abundance drives aquatic beetle colonization. Ecology 98:2201-2215.
*Pintar, M. R. & W. J. Resetarits, Jr. 2017. Relative predation risk and risk of desiccation co-determine oviposition preferences in Cope's gray treefrog, Hyla chrysoscelis. Oecologia 184(2):423-430.
*Pintar, M. R. & W. J. Resetarits, Jr. 2017. Context dependent colonization: regional reward contagion drives local compression in aquatic beetles. Journal of Animal Ecology 86:1124-1135.
Resetarits, W. J. Jr. & *M. R. Pintar. 2016. Functional diversity of non-lethal effects, chemical camouflage, and variation in fish avoidance in colonizing beetles. Ecology 97:3517-3529.
Resetarits, W. J. Jr. & A. Silberbush. 2016. Local contagion and regional compression: habitat selection drives spatially explicit, multi-scale dynamics of colonization in experimental metacommunities. Ecology Letters 19:191-200 doi: 10.1111/ele.12553
*Resetarits, W. J. Jr. and *C. A. Binckley. 2013. Is the Pirate really a Ghost? Evidence for generalized chemical camouflage in an aquatic predator, Pirate Perch (Aphredoderus sayanus). The American Naturalist 181:690-699. *Featured in a variety of media, including: New Scientist, Nature Research Briefs, Inside Science, Scientific American, and Wikinews. pdf
Resetarits, W. J., Jr. and *C. A. Binckley. 2009. Spatial contagion of predation risk affects colonization rate and community structure in experimental landscapes. Ecology 90:869-876. pdf
Resetarits, W. J., Jr. and D. R. Chalcraft. 2007. Functional diversity within a morphologically conservative genus of predators: implications for functional equivalence and redundancy in ecological communities. Functional Ecology 21:793-804.*Selected for 100 Influential Papers Published in 100 Years of British Ecological Society Journals. pdf
Resetarits, W. J., Jr. 2005. Habitat selection links local and regional scales in aquatic systems. Ecology Letters 8:480-486. pdf

The Resetarits Lab is based in the Department of Biology and housed primarily at the University of Mississippi Field Station (UMFS), approximately 11 miles from the main campus in Oxford. Students have office space both on campus and at UMFS. The Lab has outstanding space and facilities and access to over 200 experimental ponds and wetlands at the UMFS (check us out on Google maps https://www.google.com/maps/@34.425776,-89.3935815,15.02z), hundreds of mesocosms of various sizes for experimental work, and dedicated field vehicles. The Department of Biology at The University of Mississippi has an organismal focus, including a dynamic and growing group of ecologists and evolutionary biologists (http://biology.olemiss.edu/). The University of Mississippi is dedicated to fostering diversity at all levels within the University community (http://50years.olemiss.edu/). Oxford is a small, dynamic, progressive community with excellent cultural amenities, great food, a fun atmosphere, and a reasonable cost of living. The University of Mississippi campus is one of the most beautiful in the country.

For more information contact me at the address below. To begin the application procedure, please attach a letter of interest, unofficial transcripts and GRE scores, and resume (including contact information for 3 references) to Dr. William Resetarits (wresetar@olemiss.edu).

Posted 1/14/21

MS Position Available to Study Fire Ecology of Longleaf Pine Forests

An M.S. research assistantship is available with Dr. Heather Alexander (School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences at Auburn University) and Dr. Jeffery Cannon (Landscape Ecology Lab, Jones Center at Ichauway). The successful applicant will conduct extensive field research investigating spatial drivers of fuel composition, microclimate, and tree regeneration in a longleaf pine ecosystem and/or a variety of sites across the southeast. The research will combine field intensive fuel and regeneration data collection and processing, as well as micro-meteorological data collection and analysis. The student will be appointed as a Graduate Research Assistant (GRA) but will assist with teaching undergraduate courses in Forest Fire Management and Forest Ecology (Spring 2022/2023). Although an M.S. student at Auburn University, the student’s work will be co-sponsored by the Jones Center at Ichauway, and portions of the field work will take place in southwestern Georgia at the Jones Center, a 28,500-acre research facility and preserve in Newton, Georgia. The student will be expected to spend time in residence at the Jones Center for field data collection where housing may be provided, and remaining portions of the academic year on the Auburn campus while completing coursework.

Applicants must have a Bachelor's degree in forestry, plant physiology, ecology, wildlife sciences, or a related field. Applicants must: 1) be in excellent physical condition and capable of working long hours outdoors exposed to harsh weather, biting insects, and thorny vegetation, and 2) have a strong desire to pursue non-field related activities including data analysis and scientific writing. Previous experience with research, data analysis, and data management skills are preferred. Must also possess a current and valid driver's license and be able to drive a state vehicle. If interested, please email to Dr. Heather Alexander (heather.alexander@auburn.edu) and Dr. Jeffery Cannon (Jeffery.cannon@jonesctr.org) (1) a cover letter discussing interest in the research, qualifications, and applicable background experience; (2) a resume/CV; (3) unofficial transcripts, and (4) contact information for three professional references. Details on the full application process to the Auburn Graduate School can be found at http://graduate.auburn.edu/prospective-students/application-instructions/. Additional information on the Landscape Ecology Lab and the Jones Center can be found at http://www.jonesctr.org/.  Financial support is available for two years, starting in fall 2021, and includes a stipend ($18,000/year) and tuition waiver. Review of applications will begin Friday, February 26, 2021. Virtual interviews will begin Friday, March 12, 2021.

Heather D. Alexander
Assistant Professor of Forest Ecology
School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences
Auburn University
602 Duncan Dr., Auburn, AL 36849
heather.alexander@auburn.edu
(334) 844-1040

Posted 1/13/21

Graduate Student Assistantship

The Idaho IPM Laboratory at the Department of Entomology, Plant Pathology and Nematology in the University of Idaho has a PhD student assistantship to study applied ecology of an invasive cereal aphid. Specific topics of investigation include assessing the distribution and genetic diversity of the aphid, evaluating its potential as a vector of Barley yellow dwarf virus, developing economic injury level, and contributing to the development of an online identification/decision support tool for small-grain producers.

The successful candidate is expected to work in a fast-paced environment, multi-task and assist with other laboratory projects, as needed. The laboratory is highly interdisciplinary, and the student will contribute to field, laboratory and greenhouse studies. The graduate student is encouraged (and expected) to develop their own relevant research ideas. This position provides opportunities for involvement in Extension activities such as working with stakeholders, presenting in educational venues and developing extension bulletins. Additional information about the laboratory and ongoing research is available at: https://idahoipmlaboratory.org/

Applicants with BS and/or MS in Plant Science, Entomology, Biology or other relevant fields will be considered. Willingness to travel extensively and excellent written and verbal communication skills are required. You must have a valid drivers license.

To apply email a letter of interest, unofficial transcripts, CV, and contact information of three references to Dr. Arash Rashed (arashed@uidaho.edu).

Posted 1/13/21

Graduate (MS) Position in Biology, Austin Peay State University

The Department of Biology at Austin Peay State University (APSU) invites applications for admission to our M.S. program for Fall 2021. We offer both thesis-track and non-thesis track degrees. The program comprises approximately 35 graduate students supported by research and teaching assistantships. APSU (11,000 students) is located in Clarksville, TN, 45 minutes northwest of Nashville and is in close proximity to remnant prairies, numerous parks and public lands, and diverse aquatic ecosystems. For more information about the Biology Department and resources for research, please visit www.apsu.edu/biology.

The application deadline for Fall 2021 admission is March 1. For more information on application and admission requirements, see: https://www.apsu.edu/biology/graduate/gradadmiss.php

Successful applicants may receive support from teaching or research assistantships and receive a full tuition waiver. Because support of a faculty advisor is necessary for admission to the thesis-track plan of study, interested students should communicate with potential faculty research mentors as part of the application process. The following faculty are recruiting students for the upcoming Fall 2021-22 academic year. Support of a faculty research mentor is not required for admission to the non-thesis degree track.

Mollie F. Cashner (cashnerm@apsu.edu)
There will be a Master's student position open in the Cashner Lab starting in the Fall 2021 semester. A variety of thesis projects are possible, but will be related to North American freshwater fishes, conservation, reproductive biology, and/or population genetics. There are opportunities for additional financial support during the summer (Graduate Research Assistant), but during the semester, students will be eligible for a Graduate Teaching Assistantship (GTA) through the Biology Department. Prospective students are encouraged to contact Dr. Cashner by 17th February via email (cashnerm@apsu.edu).

C.M. Gienger (giengerc@apsu.edu)
Reptile Physiology

Rebecca Blanton Johansen (johansenr@apsu.edu )
Evolution, phylogeography, and conservation of freshwater fishes and crayfishes.

Sergei Markov (markovs@apsu.edu)
Research interests include: a) bacteriophage genome annotation; b) molecular hydrogen production by microorganisms and c) microalgae for biofuels and chemicals.

Gilbert Pitts (pittsg@apsu.edu)
Reproductive neuroendocrinology. Particularly, control of gonadotropin-releasing hormone.

Stefan Woltmann (woltmanns@apsu.edu)
Behavioral and breeding ecology of birds associated with forested streams; survey and ecology of imperiled grassland/prairie birds in the region.

Alex Zhang (zhanga@apsu.edu)
Dr. Zhang's research interests include bacterial infectious diseases, vaccine development, epidemiology, and bacterial genomics. Prospective Master's degree students are encouraged to contact Dr. Zhang at zhanga@apsu.edu.

Evan Rehm (rehme@apsu.edu)
Global Change biology with an emphasis on climate change, plant community ecology, plant-animal interactions and invasive species. Prospective Master's students are encouraged to contact Dr. Rehm before February 10th (rehme@apsu.edu).

Don Dailey (daileyd@apsu.edu)
Molecular characterization of pathogenic bacteria; survey of bacteria responsible for zoonotic disease. Prospective Master's students are encouraged to contact Dr. Dailey before February 17th (daileyd@apsu.edu).

Manisha Gupte (guptem@apsu.edu)
Obesity has reached epidemic proportions worldwide and is associated with an increased risk of numerous metabolic abnormalities including Hypertension, Diabetes Mellitus, and Heart Failure. My primary research interest is to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying these pathologies in an obesogenic environment. Prospective students are encouraged to contact Dr. Gupte at guptem@apsu.edu

Austin Peay State University embraces diversity as a core value and as essential for our effective participation in the global community. Therefore, Austin Peay State University (APSU) does not discriminate against students, employees, or applicants for admission or employment on the basis of race, color, religion, creed, national origin, sex (including pregnancy), sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, disability, age, status as a protected veteran, genetic information, or any other legally protected class with respect to all employment, programs and activities sponsored by APSU.

Posted 1/13/21

M.S. Assistant - Fish Ecology

Position/Title: M.S. Research Assistantship – Riverine Fish Community Response to Experimental Flow Releases From Reservoirs

Agency/State: Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management, Iowa State University, Ames (http://www.nrem.iastate.edu/)

Responsibilities: With guidance from academic advisors and agency collaborators, evaluate the effects of Red Rock Dam experimental flow releases on downstream fish communities in the Des Moines River, including impacts on food resources (zooplankton, benthic macroinvertebrates) and abiotic conditions. Supervise technicians, perform fieldwork, compile data from various sources, conduct analyses, write annual progress reports, and carry out other duties as needed. Complete thesis and other requirements of M.S. degree, including submitting manuscripts for publication.

Qualifications: Bachelor’s degree in ecology, environmental science, fisheries, or related field. Coursework or comparable experience with aquatic ecology, freshwater fish and/or fisheries, rivers, and biostatistics is desirable. Demonstrated strength in written and oral communication, analytical skills, strong academic credentials, and boat operating/trailering experience are preferred. Applicants should be highly motivated, demonstrate a strong work ethic, be physically capable and willing to frequently work in demanding outdoor conditions, and possess a valid driver’s license.

Salary: ~$25,000/year plus benefits and 50% tuition waiver

Contact/Email: Send pre-application (cover letter, résumé, copies of transcripts, and contact information of 3 references) electronically to Dr. Michael Weber (mjw@iastate.edu).

Closing Date: Review begins February 8, 2021; applications accepted until position filled

Start Date: On or before May 24, 2021

Posted 1/12/21

UCI Masters of Conservation and Restoration Science Accepting Applications for Fall 2021

Master's Program in Conservation and Restoration (MCRS) at UC-Irvine now accepting applications for Fall 2021

Interested in a career as a leader in research and management of natural resources?

The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and the Center for Environmental Biology (CEB) at the University of California, Irvine are accepting applications for our field-based Masters in Conservation and Restoration Science (MCRS) graduate program providing training for students interested in careers in the research and management of our natural resources. Sectors and potential careers for MCRS graduates include: non-profit land management sector, local and federal government agencies, and environmental consulting firms. For more information, visit the MCRS website (http://mcrs.bio.uci.edu), sign up for our January 22 Q&A session through the MCRS website, or contact Courtney Hunt, MCRS Academic Coordinator, at cchunt@uci.edu  .

The MCRS degree provides students with the academic and professional skills needed to study, protect, and conserve natural resources, and to hold leadership and management positions in environmental fields related to conservation, restoration, and sustainability. Potential applicants need a B.A. or B.S. degree, preferably in the natural sciences (biology, conservation biology, ecology, environmental science, forestry, wildlife biology, horticulture, or similar degree title) from a fully accredited academic institution. Applicants with undergraduate degrees in other areas will be considered but must demonstrate proficiency in the natural sciences and/or have practical experience working in this professional field.

The program includes two years of coursework and fieldwork, including 18 units of core courses (e.g., ecology, conservation science), 16 units of topical electives (e.g., environmental policy, land use policy), 18 units of technical and professional skills courses (e.g., technical writing, GIS), and 8 units associated with technical and professional workshops (e.g., regional professional gatherings). A collaborative, solutions-based group capstone project (12 units), aligned with community partner needs, integrates the program's learning objectives and requires students to apply their new skills to key environmental challenges facing society.

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. The first round of applications will be reviewed for priority admission after February 1, 2021.

Posted 1/9/21

Graduate assistantship in forest carbon modeling and accounting available Fall 2021 at UMass-Amherst (Deadline: Feb 1st)

Position Description:
Drs. Meg Graham MacLean and Peggi Clouston are seeking a highly motivated MS or PhD* student interested in exploring the socio-environmental system of forest carbon, invasive insects, mass timber production, and forest policy, to start in the Environmental Conservation Department at the University of Massachusetts - Amherst in Fall 2021. We have a funded project to investigate the carbon impacts, in terms of both storage and emissions, of harvesting eastern hemlock for use as cross laminated timber to meet some of the immanent housing demand in New England.  We hope that some of these findings and/or methods will be applicable across a wider array of species affected by forest pests, as well as help inform policy and best practices in both forestry and building sciences.  A broadly trained undergraduate from the sciences and/or engineering with interest in sustainable building technologies and forestry are encouraged to apply!  Students with experience in modeling/statistics/coding are especially sought.

Our research group will be nested within the larger interdisciplinary Environmental Conservation graduate student cohort, and this student would enroll in a thesis Master’s or PhD (deadline: February 1st).  Funding is provided through both teaching and research assistantships.  We value diversity and seek to build an inclusive research group.  Students from under-represented groups are strongly encouraged to apply and please reach out if you feel you are a good fit for the project but have not coded/modeled before.

We understand that we are in the middle of a pandemic and it’s a very challenging time for everyone. We certainly hope that the world is in a better place by Fall 2021 and we are able to meet in person, but regardless, we will discuss with the successful applicant how we can best support them and set reasonable goals and expectations in the times of COVID.

To express your interest, get more information, or ask questions about our project or mentoring, please email your CV, a short description of your research interests and career goals to mgmaclean AT umass.edu.

* A PhD student with a previous MS degree will be considered, though funding is not guaranteed beyond the first two years.  However, we are more than happy to work with the candidate on securing future funding!

Posted 1/7/21

Plant Ecology / Biogeography Master’s Student Position at Arkansas State University

The Marsico Lab is seeking a master's student interested in basic or applied plant ecology, with a desire to study the evolutionary ecology of plant life on the flood-disturbed islands of the Mississippi River, one of the largest river systems in the world. Specifically, we are seeking a driven student interested in researching plant diversity patterns and/or phenological shifts due to flooding on Mississippi River islands. Possible research projects include the use of field observations, greenhouse experiments, river gage records, and geographic information systems (GIS).

A bachelor's degree in botany, biology, ecology, or related field is required. Experience with or an interest in learning to identify vascular plant species with a variety of taxonomic keys and techniques for specimen collection and curation is required. Applicants should have a strong desire for scientific discovery, a thirst for adventure, and a knowledge of or willingness to learn boating and boat safety on an open river, trailering a boat, and GIS.

Funding for this position is provided through a combination of a 9-month teaching assistantship and by the National Science Foundation through their Scholarships in STEM program (SUPERB: https://www.astate.edu/a/biodiversityscholar/).

Applicants who are first-generation college students and/or underrepresented minority students are encouraged to apply. The successful applicant should plan to begin in August 2021, though there is a possibility for employment as a field technician on established projects beginning in May or June 2021, prior to the start of graduate school.

Arkansas State University is a comprehensive, state-supported, doctoral university with high research activity (R2). The Department of Biological Sciences has nearly 500 undergraduate and 60 graduate students across Biology, Environmental Sciences, and Molecular BioSciences graduate programs. Jonesboro is a community of nearly 80,000 people located in Northeast Arkansas, amidst the Mississippi Alluvial Plain and Crowley's Ridge ecoregions. We are an hour away from Memphis, Tennessee, and the Ozark Highlands. Jonesboro boasts a regional center for quality healthcare, a variety of dining and entertainment options, a low cost of living, and plenty of recreational opportunities.

If interested contact Dr. Travis Marsico at tmarsico@astate.edu or 870-680-8191. You can learn more about the lab at www.travismarsico.com.

If you plan to apply, please send an email to tmarsico@astate.edu that includes 1) a cover letter describing your interests, career goals, and relevant research experiences and skills; 2) your Curriculum Vitae [including names and contact information for three references]; and 3) a copy of your academic transcripts. Review of requested pre-application materials listed above will begin on January 25, 2021, and review of applications will continue until position is filled.

Travis D. Marsico, Ph.D.
Professor of Botany
Department of Biological Sciences
Curator, Arkansas State University Herbarium (STAR)
Arkansas State University
PO Box 599
State University, AR 72467
870-680-8191
www.travismarsico.com

Posted 1/7/21

Seeking a PhD student (Tropical ant ecology) apply ASAP

Applicants are invited to apply for one doctoral student position (official start date August 2021) to join the labs of Dr. Donald Yee and Dr. Kaitlin Baudier. The position will focus on aspects of the population or community ecology of ants in El Yunque National Forest in Puerto Rico at the NSF funded Luquillo Long Term Ecological Research site (LTER). The position will be supported during the summer months by the LTER (travel, lodging, and per diem). More info on the LTER can be found here: http://luq.lter.net work/

Multiple areas of ant-focused research interests are welcomed. Research at the LTER site is currently focused on effects of climate change including drought and large disturbances like hurricanes on various taxa and on food web dynamics. We have data from ant communities pre- and post-Hurricane Maria (2017) that would serve as a good foundation for more specific hypothesis driven questions. Amazing opportunities exist to collaborate with scientists in the LTER studying ant-relevant topics
and to explore some foundational questions about ants in the rain forests of Puerto Rico. The LTER in Puerto Rico has multiple decades worth of data on various taxa that may be relevant.

Required experience: coursework in ecology, entomology (specifically ants), and statistics
Preferred experience: tropical field work, Spanish

Full tuition scholarships for the successful applicant are provided. Support is provided by teaching assistantships and research assistantships when available.

The deadline for Spring 2021 applications is 15 February 2020, but please contact both PIs by email as soon as possible before applying (selections must be made prior to application). To inquire, submit (via e-mail) a cover letter with a brief (~ one page) review of your research experience and interests and goals and a CV to both:

donald.yee@usm.edu 
Donald A. Yee, Ph.D.
School of Biological, Environmental, and Earth Sciences
University of Southern Mississippi
twitter: @mosquitolab

kmbaudier@gmail.com 
Kaitlin M. Baudier, Ph. D.
School of Biological, Environmental, and Earth Sciences
University of Southern Mississippi
twitter: @kaitlin_baudier

Women and students from underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. The Yee and Baudier Labs are committed to an inclusive environment for all members.

More information about this job: https://www.kmbaudier.com/uploads/5/7/9/5/57951825/graduate_position_available_in_ant_ecology.pdf
More information about the Yee lab: https://aquaticinsectecology.org/
More information about the Baudier lab: https://kmbaudier.com/
More information about the biological sciences graduate program at USM: https://www.usm.edu/biological-sciences/graduate-program

Posted 1/7/21

Seeking a PhD student (social insect behavior or physiology) apply ASAP

The Baudier Lab in the school of Biological, Environmental and Earth Sciences at the University of Southern Mississippi seeks a PhD student (start August 2021) interested in studying social insect physiology, ecology, biogeography, and/or behavior. Multiple areas of social-insect-focused research interests and backgrounds are welcomed, with the possibility to conduct research using North American or Neotropical species.

Required experience: previous study of insects, statistics
Preferred experience: previous research involving social insects, respirometry, thermal ecology, or behavior

Full tuition scholarships for the successful applicant are provided. Support in the form of a stipend will be provided by teaching assistantships and research assistantships when available. Women and students from underrepresented groups are strongly encouraged to apply. The Baudier Lab is committed to an inclusive environment for all members.

Deadline for Spring 2021 applications is 15 February 2020, but interested parties should contact Dr. Baudier as soon as possible because decisions about lab fit must be made prior to formal application submission. To inquire, submit (via e-mail) a cover letter with a brief (~ one page) review of your research experience and interests and goals and a CV to:

kmbaudier@gmail.com 
Kaitlin M. Baudier, Ph. D.
School of Biological, Environmental, and Earth Sciences
University of Southern Mississippi
twitter: @Kaitlin_Baudier

More information about this job: https://www.kmbaudier.com/uploads/5/7/9/5/57951825/graduate_position_social_insect_physiology_and_behavior.pdf
More information about the Baudier lab: https://kmbaudier.com/
More information about the Biological Sciences Graduate Program at USM: https://www.usm.edu/graduate-programs/biological-sciences.php

Posted 1/7/21

Two Funded PhD assistantships in Dryland Soil Ecology at University of Texas, El Paso & New Mexico State University

Curious how dryland biogeochemistry is influenced by changes in microbial diversity and how this interaction affects dryland ecosystem functions?

The McLaren Lab at the University of Texas at El Paso and the Pietrasiak Lab at New Mexico State University are looking for PhD students interested in working on a recently funded ‘Critical Zone Thematic Cluster’ grant to study nutrient cycling and microbial communities in the carbonate-dominated soils of dryland ecosystems. The critical zone is the surface layer of the Earth from the top of the canopy to the groundwater that supports human life. This NSF-funded project is highly collaborative, interdisciplinary and focuses on field-based investigations in Texas, New Mexico and Idaho.

We are seeking 2 PhD students who will work collaboratively to examine nutrient cycling and limitation of plant and microbial communities in the Chihuahuan Desert, with a particular focus on phosphorus cycling. One student, working with McLaren will focus on biogeochemical processes and microbial access to nutrients and the second student, working with Pietrasiak, will focus on shifts in microbial community structure and composition under varying nutrient regimes.  Joining our team will offer the unique opportunity to collaboratively elucidate mechanisms driving changes in microbial diversity and how these changes link to functional dynamics.

Position 1 (McLaren): PhD student at the University of Texas at El Paso

The student will be supported through a combination of research and reaching assistantships. Qualified candidates should have a B.S. or M.S.(preferred) in Ecology, Biology, Environmental Science or related field, and show a strong interest in plant ecology, ecosystem ecology or biogeochemistry. Ideal candidates will have some previous research experience in field ecology, a strong work ethic, be able to work independently and with a field crew, and availability to begin in Fall 2021. More information about my lab at UT El Paso is available at www.jenniemclaren.com More information about the Department of Biological Sciences and its graduate programs can be found at https://www.utep.edu/science/biology/index.html and https://www.utep.edu/science/eeb/. Applications for graduate school are due Feb 1 but students are encouraged to contact me well in advance of that date.

Interested students should send a C.V., unofficial transcripts short statement of research interests to Jennie McLaren at jrmclaren@utep.edu prior to applying.

Position 2 (Pietrasiak): PhD student at New Mexico State University

This position will be funded through research and teaching assistantships at the Plant and Environmental Sciences (PES) Department at NMSU. At least one semester of teaching is required for the Ph.D. program in the PES Department. Successful candidates will have a strong academic record in microbiology, ecology, biology, environmental science, soil science, or a similar natural resource related field, as well as the ability to effectively collaborate, work independently, and have strong work ethics. Preference will be given to applicants who have previous research experience in microbial ecology, and an enthusiasm for field biology, lab work, and bioinformatics. The begin of this position will ideally be Fall 2021 but a Spring 2022 start can be negotiated. Information about Dr. Pietrasiak can be found at http://aces.nmsu.edu/academics/pes/soil-faculty.html and well as the activities of NMSU’s Dryland Microbes lab can be found on Twitter using @DrylandAlgae. More information about the graduate program at NMSU’s Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences can be found at https://aces.nmsu.edu/academics/pes/pes-graduate-handbook.html and the NMSU graduate school at https://gradschool.nmsu.edu/.

Interested students should send a current C.V., a brief letter of interest that includes projected research and career goals, scanned GRE scores and unofficial transcripts to Nicole Pietrasiak at npietras@nmsu.edu prior to applying. Interviews will be conducted on a rolling basis, however, for full consideration please send materials by Feb 15, 2021.

Posted 1/6/21

MS Student Position in Arctic Ecology

The McLaren lab is looking for a MS student to be involved in an NSF-funded project examining the role of small mammals in affecting carbon cycling through a combination of field experiments manipulating mammal densities, measurements of plant and soil responses, and modeling. The project is a collaboration with faculty at Columbia University, Towson University, University of New Hampshire and the Marine Biological Laboratory and involves summer field work at Barrow in northern Alaska. The student will assist with data collection for the larger project as well as conduct his/her own project in conjunction with our research questions. The student will be supported primarily through TAships, with partial RAship support.

Qualified candidates should have a B.S. in Ecology, Biology, Environmental Science or related field, and show a strong interest in plant ecology, ecosystem ecology or biogeochemistry. Ideal candidates will have some previous research experience in field ecology, a strong work ethic, be able to work independently and with a field crew, and availability to begin in June-July 2021. More information about my lab at UT El Paso is available at www.jenniemclaren.com More information about the Department of Biological Sciences and its graduate programs can be found at https://www.utep.edu/science/biology/index.html  and https://www.utep.edu/science/eeb/. Applications for graduate school are due Feb 1 but students are encouraged to contact me well in advance of that date.

Interested students should send a c.v. and short statement of research interests to Jennie McLaren at jrmclaren@utep.edu prior to applying.

Posted 1/6/21

Two MSc Positions in the Pauli Lab (UW-Madison)

We are seeking two outstanding MSc students to join the Pauli Lab, at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Given that both positions are generally related and will require similar skillsets for genetic analyses of Guloninae (martens, fishers, and their allies), we will review applications for these positions simultaneously. Both projects are fully funded for 2 years (with likely additional resources, if needed) and includes an annual stipend, plus tuition remission, health care benefits and supported research budget. The assistantship will begin September 2021. The students will be advised by Dr. Jonathan Pauli (http://labs.russell.wisc.edu/pauli/).

The first position will advance our long-term research program studying the regional dispersal and genetics of American martens across a recovery network in the Great Lakes Region. The student's thesis will involve a multi-state genetic data set to analyze structure and dispersal of American martens across a recovery network. Additional research components could be added depending on shared interests and funding opportunities. This work is in partnership with collaborators at the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, and Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.

The second position will explore the capacity of members of Guloninae (martens, fishers, and their allies) to digest different diets, and identify the functional genes and physiological mechanisms behind different foraging strategies. The student's thesis will involve identifying functional genes for digestion and next generation sequencing to explore the gut microbiome of Gulonids. The study is in collaboration with Dr. William Karasov (https://karasov.russell.wisc.edu/) and Dr. Garret Suen (https://bact.wisc.edu/people_profile.php?t=rf&p=gsuen), both faculty at UW-Madison. Additional research components could be added depending on shared interests and funding opportunities.

Applicants for either position must have a BS degree in biology, ecology, forestry, wildlife, or other related discipline. A working knowledge of population ecology, genetics and statistics are desirable, and lab experience especially with genetic samples and data is preferred. Excellent English writing and verbal communication skills are essential.

UW-Madison has a long history of excellence in ecology, conservation biology, and population genetics. The university ranks consistently among the top research universities in the United States. Total student enrollment is 43,000 of which approximately 12,000 are graduate and professional students, and there are over 2,000 faculty. The city of Madison ranks as one of the most attractive places in the U.S. to live and work. For information about campus and city, please see http://www.wisc.edu/about/.

To apply, please submit your application here: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2hJ8PGZYfNQrDyl

Please note that submitting an application includes filling out a small survey (< 15 minutes), uploading a cover letter summarizing research interests and experiences, curriculum vitae, and unofficial transcripts or summary of relevant coursework (both undergraduate and graduate). Within your application, please indicate if you would only like to be considered for one of the positions; otherwise, we will consider your application for both MSc positions.

Review of applicants will begin immediately, but the position will remain open until suitable candidates are found. Applications received by January 30th, 2021 will be given full consideration. Finalists will be notified by and instructed to submit a formal application, including reference letters, to the UW-Madison Graduate School. We will not be able to respond to queries about the status of applications, but general questions about the Wildlife Ecology graduate program can be directly to the Forest and Wildlife Ecology Student Services Coordinator. If you experience problems while filling out the application, please email Preston Thompson at preston.thompson@wisc.edu.

The University of Wisconsin-Madison is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. We promote excellence through diversity and encourage all qualified individuals to apply. The position is open to both US citizen and international candidates. Contact and program information is available on the UW-Madison Forest & Wildlife Ecology website: https://forestandwildlifeecology.wisc.edu/academics/21417982244_4e0823cb05_k/

Posted 1/6/21

Graduate Assistantship - FW Mussel Life History & Ecology

The Aquatic Ecosystem Health Laboratory at the University of Georgia invites applications for a Graduate Assistantship in freshwater mussel conservation biology, ecology and genetics, beginning Summer 2020. Applications for a doctoral dissertation are strongly preferred.

The successful applicant will join a team of researchers from the University of Georgia, Albany State University, the Georgia Water Planning and Policy Institute, and the Flint RiverQuarium using molecular approaches to identify freshwater mussel larvae (glochidia) and juveniles collected from wild caught host fish in the Flint River of southern Georgia. This Is a dynamic opportunity for a motivated graduate student to conduct applied conservation research and work with a diverse team of researchers. The lower Flint River basin is among the most diverse freshwater mussel assemblages in the United States.

The research team encourages applicants from groups underrepresented in natural resource science and those dedicated to developing and contributing to a community of respect, inclusiveness, and equality in science and education.

Funding:
Four years of assistantship funding are available. The first year of funding is as a Graduate Research Assistant (GRA) dedicated to a research partnership between UGA, ASU, the Flint RiverQuarium, and the Georgia Water Policy Institute. The remaining three years of funding will come from continued grant opportunities on the project, PI provided start-up assistantships at the University of Georgia, other identified grant opportunities, or the combination of the above. Students shall receive a competitive Graduate Assistantship stipend and a graduate tuition waiver.
Responsibilities:

The student will develop a course of study and research projects under the supervision of Dr. Peter Hazelton at the Warnell School of Forestry & Natural Resources - leading to peer reviewed publications and dissertation/thesis in the area of freshwater mussel life history, ecology, and conservation biology.

The first year of the Assistantship will be spent developing and participating in multi-institutional research on identification of larval and juvenile freshwater mussels using genetic markers. The student will be stationed in Albany, GA for the summer of 2021 to coordinate this effort on-site. As part of this project, the student will be responsible for:
• Developing field and laboratory protocols for collection of host fish and isolating early lifestage freshwater mussels for genetic analysis
• Coordinating and overseeing training and day-to-day collection of samples at the Flint RiverQuarium and Albany State University
• Coordinating meetings and communication between research partners at partner institutions (UGA, ASU, RiverQuarium, GA Water Planning & Policy Institute)
• Assisting with the analysis of meta-barcoding genetic data to identify mussel species
• Analysis of data and development of reports, publications, and subsequent grant applications

Required qualifications:
Preferred candidates (PhD) will have completed a MSc in Fisheries, Wildlife, Ecology, Conservation Genetics (or other related field) by the start date of May or June 2021. Relevant work experience may be considered in lieu of a previous graduate degree for competitive candidates interested in an MSc or PhD. Applicants must demonstrate interest in coordination of research teams as well as research competency, and should have demonstrated experience in one or more of the following areas:
• Large river fisheries and/or freshwater mussel sampling, ecology
• Freshwater mussel life history research
• Conservation genetics approaches including DNA extraction, meta-barcoding sequencing & analysis
• Ability to conduct research as part of a multi-disciplinary team with partners from varying backgrounds

To Apply:
Please email Dr. Peter Hazelton at phaze@uga.edu with the subject: "Flint River Mussel Opportunity", and the following as 1 combined pdf attachment: (i) Brief cover letter describing your research interests, professional/research experience and career goals; (ii) Resume/CV including contact information for 3 professional references. Following review of applicants and interviews, competitive applicants will be asked to submit an official application the University of Georgia Graduate School.

Domestic (U.S.) applicants should submit preliminary materials to Dr. Hazelton by February 1, 2021 and be prepared to submit a graduate admissions application by April 1, 2021.
International applicants should submit preliminary materials to Dr. Hazelton by January 15, 2021 and be prepared to submit a graduate admissions application by February 15, 2021.

Please direct inquiries to Dr. Peter Hazelton at phaze@uga.edu 

The University of Georgia is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, ethnicity, age, genetic information, disability, gender identity, sexual orientation or protected veteran status.

Posted 1/4/21

Recruiting a funded PhD student, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff

We are still looking to fill a PhD position for Fall 2021. This project has it all: ecological restoration + innovation + fire + mosses + microbial ecology + soil health.

We do not discriminate, all types of qualified humans are welcome to inquire. Flagstaff is an excellent place to live, popular with outdoor enthusiasts. More below.

The School of Forestry, Northern Arizona University, seeks a motivated Ph.D. student to conduct field and greenhouse experiments in and near Flagstaff, Arizona starting in Fall 2021. The student will explore the utility of using greenhouse-grown mosses to enhance ecological restoration of burned forests. Specifically, they will: 1. Improve greenhouse cultivation techniques 2. Determine if mosses can support desired soil microbiota, 3. Develop methods to pelletize mosses for deployment in the field, 4. Quantify the effect of added moss pellets on soil health in post-fire environments. Funding would provide a research assistantship consisting of an annual stipend of $26,660, tuition remission (tuition is paid for you, not by you), and student health coverage, in addition to travel and project costs. We expect 4 years of funding.

Qualifications: Master of Science in Forestry, Biology, Environmental Science is preferred. Candidates with Bachelor of Science in Forestry, Biology, Environmental Science or related field plus research experience (undergraduate thesis, capstone or internship, or employment-related experience) will also be evaluated. Candidates with greenhouse or field research experience will be strongly favored. Candidates with previous experience in soil ecology and/or bryophyte/biocrust ecology will also be favored. The candidate must satisfy all requirements set by the School of Forestry, and Northern Arizona University.

Admissions requirements (Deadline Feb 15, 2021):

GPA of 3.0 or greater on a 4.0 scale in all college and university work

GRE scores in the top 40th percentile

If English is not your native language:

a score of at least 80 on the internet-based TOEFL or

550 on the paper-based TOEFL or

213 on the computer-based TOEFL

Three letters of recommendation

How to apply: First contact us directly (matthew.bowker@nau.edu) with a statement of your research interests, why you're interested in this opportunity, and motivations for attending graduate school, with "Fire moss graduate student inquiry" in the header. Please provide a resume or C.V. and provide your GRE scores (if taken) and GPA. If we agree that you are a good match for the position, we will encourage you to formally apply to the program. We will make our final selection from those applicants.

Posted 12/30/20

2 PhD student opportunities, remote sensing vegetation/snow and peatlands

1. Graduate Research Assistantship (PhD) Available to Study Remote Sensing of Vegetation and Snow at Boise State University:

Boise State University Department of Geosciences has a PhD Research Assistantship available for Fall 2021 (or earlier) for a student interested in studying vegetation and snow with remote sensing. The student can work with a range of ground-based (terrestrial laser scanning, TLS), UAS, airborne and spaceborne lidar to understand forest and shrub vegetation structure and functional characteristics and their distribution across mid- and high-latitude ecosystems. The student will have the opportunity to develop their own study ranging from understanding the interactions between vegetation and snow, carbon/water/nutrient storage and flux, as well as controls on vegetation and snow distributions, and using Earth System Models and remote sensing observations to study these controls. The project is funded by NASA. The student is expected to work with a team of scientists and perform field work.

2. Graduate Research Assistantship (PhD) Available to Understand the Response of Peatlands to a Warming Study with Remote Sensing at Boise State University:

Boise State University Department of Geosciences has a PhD Research Assistantship available for Fall 2021 (or earlier) for a student interested in studying how warming and increased CO2 affects peatlands utilizing field, remote sensing and modeling tools. The student will have the opportunity to utilize ground-based lidar (terrestrial laser scanning, TLS) along with other remote sensing platforms to estimate changes in biomass and other vegetation structure in northern Minnesota and other boreal ecosystems. The project is part of the DOE SPRUCE project (https://mnspruce.ornl.gov/), and thus the student will have the opportunity to collaborate with a range of ecosystem and modeling experts. The project is funded by DOE. The student is expected to work with a team of scientists and perform field work.
About the program

For both positions:
The students have the opportunity to choose from a range of degree programs at Boise State University, and be part of the Department of Geosciences and/or Human Environment Systems (HES) group. The Department of Geosciences has a vibrant graduate student culture and works closely with HES. HES is a group of faculty and students committed to transdisciplinary, team-based, actionable research that addresses real- world environmental challenges. The range of PhD programs include: PhD Ecology and Evolutionary Behavior, PhD Geosciences, PhD Geophysics, or PhD Computing. The students will be advised by Nancy Glenn.

Qualifications
Minimum qualifications:
•Bachelor of Science or Arts (BS or BA) in Geoscience, Biology, Engineering, or a related field
•Experience working with remotely sensed data and spatial analysis
•Strong quantitative skills, including proficiency using R or other statistical, geospatial software
•Field experience
•Experience and/or interest working in collaborative, transdisciplinary teams grounded in mutual respect and responsibility

Preferred qualifications:
•Master of Science (MS) in Geoscience, Biology, Engineering, or a related field and research or job experience related to the topics above
•Expertise collecting, compiling, and analyzing large datasets
•Programming experience in Python or other language
•Demonstrated research success through peer-reviewed publications and / or delivery of results to relevant stakeholders

To Apply
Please send via email to Dr. Glenn:
•a cover letter that states why you are interested in this position and if / how you meet each of the qualifications listed above;
•a CV that includes employment history with dates of employment;
•names and contact information for three (3) professional references; and
•copies of transcripts (unofficial are fine).

Please include "PhD application in the email subject line and include your last name in all file names to nancyglenn@boisestate.edu.

About Boise
Nestled in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains and the capital of the state of Idaho, Boise is frequently featured as a top-ranked metropolis. The city has ample opportunities for world-class outdoor activities year-round and a thriving arts and entertainment culture: http://www.boisechamber.org

Posted 12/23/20

Position Opening: National Science Foundation Ph.D./M.S. Graduate Fellowships at Nebraska

Due to testing difficulties during COVID, please note that GRE scores will not be required to apply for the graduate fellowships/traineeships in the National Science Foundation Research Traineeship (NRT) at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 2021:

The National Science Foundation Research Traineeship (NRT) at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln is an interdisciplinary employment and education opportunity. We hire students from many different STEM disciplines to go to graduate school and conduct research related to resilience and the sustainability of food, energy, water, and ecosystem services, particularly in the Platte River Basin in Nebraska.

Suitable background disciplines and areas of study for students in this interdisciplinary program include agronomy, biological sciences, biological systems engineering, civil engineering, computer sciences and engineering, economics, electric and computer engineering, entomology, environmental science, geosciences, natural resources, plant sciences, and public policy. Students will take part in special trainings and classes besides their regular schoolwork and will conduct research and write a paper or produce a product.

Students receive a stipend ($34,000 a year for up to two years for master's students and $36,000 a year for up to three years for Ph.D. students) while successfully completing the training and earning their advanced degree in a field related to our research. Students also receive remitted tuition and health insurance while in the traineeship. Barring COVOD-19 and if travel is permitted, they will take a trip to The Netherlands (and, usually, two other European countries like France and Spain) to compare water structures there with ones in Nebraska.

We seek to hire three to four students to start graduate school and the NRT traineeship on August 1, 2021. First-generation college students and students from minority groups underrepresented in the sciences are especially encouraged to apply. International students are not eligible for this National Science Foundation program.

To apply, email the following to Ronica Stromberg, Program Coordinator, at rstromberg3@unl.edu:

• Statement or letter of interest
• Curriculum vitae or resume
• All college academic transcripts
• UNL department in which you would plan to use the graduate school tuition benefit

For more information, email Ms. Stromberg or see https://nrt.unl.edu.

Deadline for applications: March 15, 2021
Start date: August 1, 2021

Posted 12/23/20

Graduate position in butterfly conservation biology in the Great Basin

We are seeking a graduate student interested in insect conservation to conduct research on an endangered butterfly endemic to Nevada. Research goals include but are not limited to mapping of microhabitat occupancy and use by adults, caterpillars and host plants. The project is well suited to a Master's degree, but we are open to the possibility of students interested in a PhD (both degrees are offered through our graduate program in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation Biology). More information on the Forister lab and other projects can be found at: sites.google.com/site/greatbasinbuglab/. Applications are welcome from anyone interested in conservation and butterfly biology.

UNR has a strong interdisciplinary research environment in ecology, evolution and conservation biology, and UNR is a Tier I research university located in a spectacular environment at the intersection of the Great Basin and Sierra Nevada Mountains. The faculty and graduate students at UNR are highly interactive and include an internationally known group of applied and basic ecologists. We are also located in an ideal setting for field-based science with easy access to spectacular montane and desert ecosystems. Reno is 45 minutes from Lake Tahoe, offers a high quality of living, an excellent climate, and is a large enough city to offer diverse activities and amenities. World class rock climbing, skiing, and mountain biking opportunities are in close proximity.

Those interested should contact Matt Forister via email: forister@gmail.com with a CV and a brief description of your interests and goals (can be in the email). Start date for the project is the Fall semester, 2021.

Posted 12/23/20

M.S. Assistantship: Population ecology of moose in Maine, Orono, ME

A 2-year Masters position is available in the Morano and Kamath Labs at the University of Maine, starting in the Fall 2021 semester.

We seek a motivated and enthusiastic student to examine questions related to habitat ecology and population dynamics of Maine moose (Alces alces).  The successful applicant will work as part of a collaborative team composed of faculty and graduate students at the University of Maine, and professionals from the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (MDIFW). The student would be considering questions of moose habitat use and survival dynamics in the context of resource allocation, habitat selection, winter severity, winter tick dynamics and other potential epidemiological factors. This is primarily a modeling project, taking advantage of data collected by the MDIFW; field work may consist of assisting agency personnel with data collection, or collecting and processing biological samples. Results from this study aim to inform management efforts and conservation planning for moose in Maine and would be relevant to populations throughout the southern extent of their range.

The student will be a member of the Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Conservation Biology at the University of Maine, with options for pursuing a MS in Wildlife Ecology or Ecology and Environmental Sciences, co-advised by Dr. Sabrina Morano and Dr. Pauline Kamath.  Support for the student will come in the form of a graduate assistantship (which also covers tuition, (50%) of health insurance), which may include a combination of both research and teaching assistantships.   

The successful candidate should have a strong undergraduate academic background in wildlife, ecology, or a related field, and desire to use basic ecological theory to address current conservation challenges for large mammals. Competitive applicants will have skills/interests in GIS, statistical modeling, survival analyses, and the use of Program R for data analysis and management.  In addition, a willingness to work outside in cold, wet conditions and to participate in collection of biological samples from living or dead animals is required.  Successful candidates will also have demonstrated leadership and initiative at the undergraduate level, have the capacity to manage multiple competing tasks for their time (e.g., write a proposal, assisting with field work, take graduate level courses), are goal oriented and self-directed with an ability to overcome obstacles to finish tasks, and have an interest in collaborative research.

To Apply: (1) a cover letter describing why you are pursuing a graduate degree, how this opportunity aligns with your professional interests, and current qualifications, including relevant research experience and coursework. In addition, please highlight what you feel are your strengths and weaknesses relative to this graduate position; (2) a CV detailing relevant academic qualifications and field experiences; (3) GRE scores (if available); (4) unofficial transcripts; and (5) contact information for three references. Please combine materials into a single PDF document to sabrina.morano@maine.edu with the subject line “Moose MS Position.” All applications received before January 18th will receive full consideration, but will be accepted on a rolling basis until the position is filled.

Students are also welcome to participate in one of two transdisciplinary graduate programs offered at UMaine, the Enhancing Conservation Science NRT Program or the One Health and the Environment NRT Program, please see program websites for additional information and include interest in the cover letter.

The University of Maine is an EEO/AA employer and does not discriminate on the grounds of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, including transgender status and gender expression, national origin, citizenship status, age, disability, genetic information or veteran’s status in employment, education, and all other programs and activities. Please contact the Director of Equal Opportunity, 101 N. Stevens Hall, Orono, ME 04469 at 207-581-1226 (voice), TTY 711 (Maine Relay System), or equal.opportunity@maine.edu with questions or concerns.   

Sabrina Morano
Conservation Science NRT Program Coordinator
Assistant Research Professor, University of Maine
Wildlife, Fisheries, and Conservation Biology
Nutting Hall 216; phone: (207) 581-2908
https://umaine.edu/conservationscience/

Posted 12/22/20

MSc American marten dispersal and genetic structure across a recovery network (UW-Madison)

We are seeking an outstanding student to advance our long-term research program studying the regional dispersal and genetics of American martens in the Great Lakes Region. The student's thesis will involve a multi-state genetic data set to analyze structure and dispersal of American martens across a recovery network. Additional research components could be added depending on shared interests and funding opportunities. The assistantship will begin September 2021. The student will be advised by Dr. Jonathan Pauli (http://labs.russell.wisc.edu/pauli/) and partner closely with collaborators at the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. The project is fully funded for 2 years (with likely additional resources, if needed) and includes an annual stipend, plus tuition remission, health care benefits and supported research budget.

Applicants must have a BS degree in biology, ecology, forestry, wildlife, or other related discipline. A working knowledge of population ecology, genetics and statistics are desirable, and lab experience especially with genetic samples and data is preferred. Excellent English writing and verbal communication skills are essential.

UW-Madison has a long history of excellence in ecology, conservation biology, and population genetics. The university ranks consistently among the top research universities in the United States. Total student enrollment is 43,000 of which approximately 12,000 are graduate and professional students, and there are over 2,000 faculty. The city of Madison ranks as one of the most attractive places in the U.S. to live and work. For information about campus and city, please see http://www.wisc.edu/about/.

To apply, please submit your application here: https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_2hJ8PGZYfNQrDyl

Please note that submitting an application includes filling out a small survey (< 15 minutes), uploading a cover letter summarizing research interests and experiences, curriculum vitae, and unofficial transcripts or summary of relevant coursework (both undergraduate and graduate).

Review of applicants will begin immediately, but the position will remain open until a suitable candidate is found. Applications received by January 30th, 2021 will be given full consideration. Finalists will be notified by and instructed to submit a formal application, including reference letters, to the UW-Madison Graduate School. We will not be able to respond to queries about the status of applications, but general questions about the Wildlife Ecology graduate program can be directly to the Forest and Wildlife Ecology Student Services Coordinator. If you experience problems while filling out the application, please email Preston Thompson at preston.thompson@wisc.edu.

The University of Wisconsin-Madison is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. We promote excellence through diversity and encourage all qualified individuals to apply. The position is open to both US citizen and international candidates. Contact and program information is available on the UW-Madison Forest & Wildlife Ecology website: https://forestandwildlifeecology.wisc.edu/academics/21417982244_4e0823cb05_k/

Posted 12/21/20

Masters of Science in Biology positions available at the Dept. of Biology at Eastern Washington University

The Department of Biology at Eastern Washington University has graduate student positions available beginning in the Fall of 2021. Research opportunities are diverse as the faculty members in the department have a wide range of expertise (see below).

We are located in Cheney, WA, about 20 minutes southwest of Spokane, WA. The Department has a dedicated field laboratory at the Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge, 10 minutes south of campus, a new Interdisciplinary Science Center, and a 120-acre prairie restoration project on campus.

Prospective students can apply for Graduate Student Assistantships (GSAs). These are part-time teaching assistant (TA) positions and include a tuition waiver and a stipend. GSA applicants must hold a 4-year baccalaureate degree in Biology or related discipline from an accredited college or university. Application materials include official transcripts and two recommendation letters. All material (including recommendation letters) must be submitted by the February 20 deadline.

Prospective students should contact potential advisors in their desired area of research to learn more about available opportunities. A short description of each potential advisor's research area is below.

For more information, please see:
• The Biology Department Website: https://www.ewu.edu/cstem/biology/
• The Biology MSc curriculum: https://www.ewu.edu/cstem/biology/biology-ms/
• The history and success of program alumni: https://ewubiologyblog.wordpress.com/2019/01/23/looking-to-earn-an-msc-in-biology-come-join-the-ewu-biology-graduate-program/
• or contact Dr. Camille McNeely, the Biology Graduate Program Advisor, at fmcneely@ewu.edu.

Faculty in the Department of Biology

Jessica Allen: Recruiting a student to work on an ongoing lichen population genomic and comparative genomics studies. Broad research interests in lichen evolution, conservation, natural history collections, herbaria, population genetics, and comparative genomics. jallen73@ewu.edu 

Jason Ashley: Cellular and molecular mechanisms of skeletal physiology and disease. https://inside.ewu.edu/jashley6/ or jashley6@ewu.edu 

Justin Bastow: Soil and insect ecology, plant-insect interactions, terrestrial ecosystem ecology. Carbon and nutrient cycling in soils, especially in the context of prairie restoration. jbastow@ewu.edu 

Ross Black: The ecology and evolution of aquatic organisms, population biology, limnology, ecological genetics, life history evolution. rblack@ewu.edu 

Rebecca L. Brown: Plant ecology, including riparian ecology, restoration ecology, and invasive species management. Current projects include prairie restoration, restoring river ecosystems affected by dams, and interacting effects of beaver and wildfire on river ecosystems. https://inside.ewu.edu/rbrown/ or rbrown@ewu.edu 

Judd Case: Evolutionary biology, mammalogy, vertebrate paleontology and the connection between climatic and floral changes and patterns of mammalian evolution, with an emphasis on the evolution, biogeography and systematics of marsupials and the Gondwanan biota. jcase@ewu.edu 

Andrea Castillo: Bacterial pathogenesis. Studying the molecules Helicobacter pylori uses to infect and cause gastric disease in humans. acastillo@ewu.edu 

David Daberkow: Neurobiology, molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with learning and memory, effect of drugs on brains and behavior. ddaberkow@ewu.edu 

Charles Herr: Differentiation of early mammalian embryos; development of technologies to use on mammalian embryos and gametes; application of molecular biology techniques to research problems in mammalian embryology. cherr@ewu.edu 

Bo Idsardi: Biology education, active learning in undergraduate STEM courses. https://inside.ewu.edu/idsardi/ or ridsardi@ewu.edu 

Krisztian Magori: Biostatistics and disease ecology. https://inside.ewu.edu/diseaseecology/ or kmagori@ewu.edu 

Joanna J. Matos: Comparative physiology, ecology and evolution of aquatic invertebrates and the model organism/Caenorhabditis elegans/(rhabditid nematode). https://inside.ewu.edu/jmatos/ or jmatos@ewu.edu 

Luis Matos: Evolutionary genetics of virus-pathogen interactions. Applied molecular biotechnology. https://inside.ewu.edu/lmatos/ or Lmatos@ewu.edu 

Camille McNeely: Stream ecology, role of freshwater invertebrates in stream communities and ecosystems. fmcneely@ewu.edu 

Javier Ochoa-Reparaz: Host-pathogen interactions, gut microbiome, effects of oral MS therapeutics in the gut microbiota. jochoareparaz@ewu.edu 

Margaret O'Connell: Wildlife ecology and conservation, restoration of wildlife habitat and wildlife populations, vertebrate behavior and population ecology. moconnell@ewu.edu 

Robin O'Quinn: Evolution of morphological diversity, plant systematics, population genetics of rare species, biogeography/phylogeography, native plant propagation. roquinn@ewu.edu 

Paul Spruell: Application of population genetic techniques to questions of fisheries management and conservation. pspruell@ewu.edu 

Jenifer Walke: Microbial and disease ecology; host-microbe interactions; community structure-function relationships; probiotics to promote host health and for wildlife conservation. https://www.walkelab.com/ or jwalke@ewu.edu 

Posted 12/17/20

PhD Graduate Research Assistantship (Tropical Plant Ecology and Conservation)

Fully funded Ph.D. student position at Florida International University in tropical plant ecology and conservation

We have one opening for a fully funded Ph.D. student at Dr. Hong Liu's tropical plant conservation laboratory (https://liulab.fiu.edu/people/index.html) at Florida International University (FIU) located in Miami Florida. The successful candidate will be supported by two years of research assistantship followed by up to three years of teaching assistantship. As part of the research assistant duty, the successful candidate will work with botanists and GIS experts from FIU, Fairchild Tropical Botanic Garden and other institutions on a National Park funded project to assess the impacts of Hurricane Irma on epiphytes (orchids and bromeliads) in the Everglades National Park. The position starts in Fall 2021.

Eligibility: Applicants must have a BS or MS degree in Biological Sciences or Natural Resources Management or similar majors. Students who are interested in and have field work experience in community disturbance ecology, plant population dynamics and conservation, tropical or epiphytic plant (orchids or bromeliads or ferns) ecology are strongly encouraged to apply. As the field sites are remote, applicants should be comfortable with prolonged exposure to the elements, long hikes, and sometimes hot and buggy conditions.

To Apply: All applicants must meet the minimum requirements set by the graduate admission of FIU and the Department of Earth and Environment. Information for applying to FIU Graduate School can be found here: https://admissions.fiu.edu/how-to-apply/graduate-applicant/index.html. Deadline to apply to the FIU Graduate School for Fall 2021 is February 1, 2021. Proficiency in spoken and written English is a must. International students should also meet the minimum requirements of TOEFL (the same link above).

Prospective graduate students are encouraged to contact Dr. Hong Liu (hliu@fiu.edu) first to discuss potential research projects and opportunities before applying. When contacting by email, please include the following items: 1) unofficial transcripts, 2) a brief cover letter describing your research experience, interests and goals; and 3) current CV/resume, including contact information for three references. The email should be titled "The hurricane and epiphyte project". We greatly appreciate all the interested applications, but advise that only candidates shortlisted for phone interviews will be notified of the application results.

More about FIU: FIU is a R1 member of the State University System of Florida and an Equal Opportunity, Equal Access Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability or protected veteran status.

Dr. Hong Liu is a member of the International Center for Tropical Botany (https://environment.fiu.edu/land-and-biodiversity/ictb/index.html) and Institute of Environment (https://environment.fiu.edu/research/index.html), a preeminent program in environmental research in the US.

Posted 12/16/20

Graduate Research Assistantship: Cross-Habitat Spillover of Insects in Human Modified Landscapes

We are seeking a highly motivated Master's student to join the Kim Lab in the Department of Entomology at Kansas State University. Members of the Kim Lab study the ecology of plant-insect interactions and how these interactions vary with insect management and land-use change. For more information about our current work, please visit taniakimecology.com.

The Master's student will collaborate with our post-doc (Dr. Rachel Harman) on a project examining how insect movement across habitat boundaries affect insect biodiversity and ecosystem function. The research will involve a combination of field work in nearby KS landscapes and lab/greenhouse work. Students interested in the fields of community ecology, agroecology, landscape ecology, and food-web interactions are encouraged to apply.

The position will be competitively funded through a two-year research assistantship (tuition and stipend). We prefer that the student starts at the beginning of the fall 2021 semester (end of August), although earlier start dates (as early as June 2021) may be considered.

Requirements: Competitive applicants will have backgrounds in biology, ecology or entomology with an interest in conservation and insect biology. Prior experience doing field work and being part of a research project is desirable. Strong quantitative skills (statistics, coding) are also desirable. Communication skills (oral and writing) are important as is the ability to work on a team.

To apply: For consideration, please email a cover letter stating your research interests and qualifications, your CV with names and contact information for 3 references, and unofficial transcripts to Dr. Tania Kim (tkim@ksu.edu) by January 18, 2021. I will begin screening applications in late-January, have initial online or phone interviews in late February/early March. Final decisions will be made by late March 2021. Please contact me with any inquiries for additional information or to arrange a phone call. We strongly encourage individuals who identify with groups currently under-represented in STEM fields to apply.

Information about the Department:
The Department of Entomology maintains excellent research facilities with state-of-the-art equipment and a research insect collection. It was recently ranked the 4th best Department of Entomology in the world by the Center for World University Rankings; these rankings are based on the number and quality of professional publications produced by the department and quality of faculty research. In the most recent rankings of PhD programs in US Departments of Entomology, we were ranked 8th nationally for overall quality by the National Research Council (http://www.phds.org/rankings/entomology).

Our mission is to: 1) provide entomological knowledge for a safe, sustainable, and competitive food, feed, and fiber system through integrated research and education; 2) maintain a stakeholder/clientele-driven focus to research, extension, and teaching activities; 3) generate fundamental information for the advancement of science and for applied uses; 4) train students for professions in education, government, business and industry; and 5) disseminate useful, unbiased information.

Diversity and Inclusion:
Our mission in the Kim Lab is to create research and learning opportunities to a diversity of students, and promote an environment based on respect, inclusivity, equity, and compassion. Kansas State University embraces diversity and promotes inclusion in every sector of the institution. The university established the Office of Diversity, led by the associate vice president for diversity and a dedicated staff. Additionally, the Department of Entomology has a Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion working group and each college has a designated Diversity Point committee to provide insight and guidance. Kansas State University received the prestigious Higher Education Excellence in Diversity, or HEED, award from Insight Into Diversity magazine for the past three years. Multicultural students account for 15 percent of our student population, a university record, and continues to trend higher.

Posted 12/15/20

PhD Graduate Research Assistantship | Solar energy-wildlife interactions in the Sonoran Desert | Cornell University

Exciting, fully funded PhD GRA @ Cornell University -- Department of Natural Resources and the Environment & USGS NY Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit

Link to job flyer: http://www.stevegrodsky.com/opportunities

Highlights:
• Creative and innovative research environment
• Cutting edge research in renewable energy ecology
• Fieldwork in the Sonoran Desert
• Competitive, 12-month stipend
• 4 years (minimum) of full support (salary, tuition, and health insurance)

Background: The rapid buildout of solar energy in the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts of California is outpacing our understanding of the ecological effects solar energy development may have on desert ecosystems. Although Californian deserts are prioritized as recipient environments for solar energy development, little empirical data exists to guide management of desert wildlife, their habitats, and ecosystem services during an unprecedented energy transition. Lack of scientific results to inform wildlife conservation and management in BLM Solar Energy Zones (SEZ) and areas within the footprint of the Desert Renewable Energy Conservation Plan may hobble conservation planning and restoration efforts. Solar energy development in Californian deserts has potential to affect wildlife and their habitats at various spatiotemporal scales, impacting ecosystem services and wildlife resources for people. Although photovoltaics (PV) have emerged as the prominent solar energy technology currently deployed worldwide, effects of site preparation for PV solar energy development and management of PV facilities on desert wildlife and their habitats, including desert washes, has yet to be empirically evaluated. Further, the conglomeration of solar facilities and other anthropogenic land conversion in deserts may affect wildlife populations at the landscape level by impeding animal movement and gene flow and affecting species distributions.

We will collaborate with BLM California to conduct novel research aimed at elucidating spatiotemporal effects of solar energy development on the conservation of wildlife and their habitats and maintenance of ecosystem services in deserts. Our objectives center on elucidating regional trends in responses of wildlife and their habitats to solar energy development before, during, and after construction of PV solar facilities in the Riverside East SEZ. Specifically, we aim to measure the spatiotemporal response of wildlife species, including indicator species and special status species, wildlife habitats, "bottom-up" ecological interactions, and ecosystem services to variable site preparation, management, and siting densities of PV facilities throughout Riverside East. We anticipate achieving multiple goals that seek to inform applied, solutions-oriented wildlife management at Riverside East.

Description: This PhD research assistantship consists of 3 months of intensive fieldwork at and around the Riverside East Solar Energy Zone, Sonoran Desert, April - June 2021 - 2023, 9 months of focused research activities at Cornell in 2021-2023, and 12 months of focused research activities at Cornell in 2024. Research activities outside of fieldwork include but are not limited to data curation and analyses, development of statistical models, GIS work, reviews and syntheses, report writing, and dissemination of scientific findings via outreach, presentations, and, most importantly, peer-reviewed publications. Field work will include setting up and maintaining ~100 camera traps throughout Riverside East, soil and vegetation sampling, and field surveys for one or more of the following taxa: birds (point counts), lizards (distance sampling), and/or mammals (scat surveys). The graduate research assistant will generate their own taxa-specific research questions, implement appropriate methodologies, and conduct studies that build upon the foundation of the existing project proposal. Ultimately, the graduate research assistant will be expected to conduct applied ecological research, publish papers in peer-reviewed journals, and professionally contribute to a collaborative team of creative researchers. This position comes with a highly competitive, annual (12-month) salary of ~$38,000, full tuition remission, and student insurance for a minimum of 4 years.

Mentor: Steve Grodsky, Ph.D. -- Director, Wild Energy Initiative Cornell | Assistant Professor, Dept. of Natural Resources and the Environment, Cornell University | Assistant Unit Leader, USGS NY Coop Unit

Key collaborators: Dr. Angela Fuller (Cornell University), Dr. Rebecca R. Hernandez (UC Davis), and the CA Office of the Bureau of Land Management

Please direct questions regarding this position to Dr. Steve Grodsky: smgrodsky@ucdavis.edu 

Qualifications:

Desired*:
• Master's degree in wildlife ecology or closely related field
• Proven capacity to publish peer-reviewed journal articles
• Experience conducting fieldwork in the Desert Southwest
• Experience with camera trapping
• Modeling and computational skills relevant to landscape ecology/animal populations
• Ability to conduct geospatial analyses in ArcMap
• Expertise in the ID/natural history of at least one desert vertebrate group
• Ability to work independently and a part of a collaborative team
• Minimum undergrad GPA of 3.6

*Applicants need not meet all desired qualifications to apply

Application:

Applicants are to send a single PDF containing: 1) cover letter; 2) CV; 3) GRE scores; 4) contact information for 3 references and 5) PDFs of relevant peer-reviewed publications (if applicable) to Dr. Steve Grodsky (smgrodsky@ucdavis.edu) by 1 February 2021. Applications will be reviewed on a continual basis. Shortlisted candidates will be contacted and required to apply for admission to the Department of Natural Resources and the Environment's Graduate Program at Cornell University.

Additional links:
Dr. Grodsky research site - http://www.stevegrodsky.com/
Dr. Fuller research site - https://blogs.cornell.edu/fullerlab/
Dr. Hernandez research site - https://www.aridlab.org/
Department of Natural Resources and the Environment, Cornell University - https://dnr.cals.cornell.edu/graduate/

Posted 12/15/20

Master’s Program in Conservation and Restoration (MCRS) at UC-Irvine

Master's Program in Conservation and Restoration (MCRS) at UC-Irvine now accepting applications for Fall 2021

Interested in a career as a leader in research and management of natural resources?

The Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology and the Center for Environmental Biology (CEB) at the University of California, Irvine are accepting applications for our field-based Masters in Conservation and Restoration Science (MCRS) graduate program providing training for students interested in careers in the research and management of our natural resources. Sectors and potential careers for MCRS graduates include: non-profit land management sector, local and federal government agencies, and environmental consulting firms. For more information, visit the MCRS webpage (http://mcrs.bio.uci.edu), or contact program administrators at uciconresscience@uci.edu.

The MCRS degree provides students with the academic and professional skills needed to study, protect, and conserve natural resources and to hold leadership and management positions in environmental fields related to conservation, restoration, and sustainability. Potential applicants will need a B.A. or B.S. degree, preferably in the natural sciences (biology, conservation biology, ecology, environmental science, forestry, wildlife biology, horticulture, or similar degree title) from a fully accredited academic institution. Applicants with undergraduate degrees in other areas will be considered but must demonstrate proficiency in the natural sciences and/or practical experience working in this professional field.

The program includes two years of coursework and fieldwork, including 18 units of core courses (e.g., ecology, conservation biology), 16 units of topical electives (e.g., environmental policy, land use policy), 18 units of technical and professional skills courses (e.g., technical writing, GIS), and 8 units associated with technical and professional workshops (e.g., regional professional gatherings). A collaborative, solutions-based group capstone project (12 units), aligned with community partner needs, integrates the program's learning objectives and requires students to apply their new skills to key environmental challenges facing society.

Applications are accepted on a rolling basis. The first round of applications will be reviewed for priority admission after February 1, 2021.

Posted 12/12/20

Ph.D. Assistantships in Geospatial Analytics at NC State University

The cutting-edge Ph.D. program in Geospatial Analytics (go.ncsu.edu/geospatial-phd) at the Center for Geospatial Analytics (geospatial.ncsu.edu) at North Carolina State University is now accepting applications for Fall 2021 enrollment. The rapidly growing program is recruiting its fourth cohort of new students, to join the first three cohorts of nearly three dozen students. Up to twelve fully funded graduate assistantships with $25,000 salary, benefits, and tuition support are available to start Fall 2021.

The application deadline is February 1, 2021.

The Center for Geospatial Analytics at NC State is an internationally recognized hub for interdisciplinary data scientists pushing the boundaries of spatial data science to advance discovery and inform real-world decision-making. Ph.D. students receive multidisciplinary advising and the opportunity to work with over thirty faculty fellows with diverse expertise from over a dozen departments across NC State. Students also work together, within and across cohorts, to collaboratively solve problems from multiple perspectives.

Faculty at the Center develop and apply innovative techniques to advance new research frontiers (geospatial.ncsu.edu/research). We amass robust datasets using emerging technologies and use that information to simulate "what-if" scenarios of change to evaluate potential risks and trade-offs. We put these forecasts into the hands of the people who need them most by developing easy-to-use, interactive decision analytics driven by sophisticated computer models. These tools use the latest geovisualization techniques to provide meaningful spatial information in accessible and intuitive formats. Our work also involves deep collaboration with government, industry, and community partners to address environmental and societal challenges important to them.

Students with quantitative and computational backgrounds in geography, informatics, or remote sensing are strongly encouraged to apply. We welcome students interested in pushing the boundaries of geospatial analytics and technology from a variety of perspectives, including design, cognitive science, natural resources and the environment, computer science, engineering, and more. We are intentionally seeking applications from students from groups that are underrepresented in the sciences.

Additional details and complete application instructions are available at go.ncsu.edu/geospatial-phd. Interested students are encouraged to contact Rachel Kasten, Graduate Services Coordinator (rachelkasten@ncsu.edu or 919-515-2800), with any questions.

Posted 12/10/20

Masters Student Position - Subsurface drainage - interface of streams and agriculture

Graduate Student Position in
Agriculture - Stream Ecology Interface
Laboratory of Bill Perry at Illinois State University - Normal IL
Funded by USDA

Description: We are looking for one masters students to join an interdisciplinary team exploring how cover crops can improve water quality in agricultural regions. This project is examining the potential ecosystem benefits of field pennycress as a new cover crop. Pennycress is a novel cover crop that can also be used to create oil that can be used as jet fuel, for example. At the Illinois State University Research Farm, we have established a replicated experiment plot system with independent subsurface drainage and automated water samplers to sample water leaving the plots for nutrients and discharge. The main goal of the thesis will be to work to explore the potential nutrient load reductions of phosphorus and nitrogen by this cover crop. The successful student will also have the option to expand the studies where they have particular interests.

Desired qualifications: Bachelors degree in biology, environmental science or a similar field. Ability to work independently, willingness to be outside inclement conditions, a driver's license and transportation to a field site. It is expected that the candidate has experience with basic computer programs including Excel, Word, PowerPoint. A basic understanding of R/RStudio is a benefit and willingness to learn and become proficient is anticipated.

Contact Bill Perry if you are interested. You can also apply directly to the graduate school at Illinois State University at https://illinoisstate.edu/academics/graduate/, potential degree programs could be within the School of Biological Sciences or hydrogeology. You can learn more about the School of Biological Science and its programs here https://biology.illinoisstate.edu/graduate/. Applications are due February 1 for fall admission.

For further information and questions, contact Dr. Bill Perry - wlperry@ilstu.edu or call at 309-438-8160

Posted 12/9/20

Funded PhD position: ecological restoration with mosses

The School of Forestry, Northern Arizona University, seeks a motivated Ph.D. student to conduct field and greenhouse experiments in and near Flagstaff, Arizona starting in Fall 2021. The student will explore the utility of using greenhouse-grown mosses to enhance ecological restoration of burned forests. Specifically, they will: 1. Improve greenhouse cultivation techniques 2. Determine if mosses can support desired soil microbiota, 3. Develop methods to pelletize mosses for deployment in the field, 4. Quantify the effect of added moss pellets on soil health in post-fire environments. Funding would provide a research assistantship consisting of an annual stipend of $26,660, tuition remission, and student health coverage, in addition to travel and project costs. We expect 4 years of funding.

Qualifications: Master of Science in Forestry, Biology, Environmental Science is preferred. Candidates with Bachelor of Science in Forestry, Biology, Environmental Science or related field plus research experience (undergraduate thesis, capstone or internship, or employment-related experience) will also be evaluated. Candidates with greenhouse or field research experience will be strongly favored. Candidates with previous experience in soil ecology and/or bryophyte/biocrust ecology will also be favored. The candidate must satisfy all requirements set by the School of Forestry, and Northern Arizona University.

Admissions requirements (Deadline Feb 15, 2021):
GPA of 3.0 or greater on a 4.0 scale in all college and university work
GRE scores in the top 40th percentile
If English is not your native language:
a score of at least 80 on the internet-based TOEFL or
550 on the paper-based TOEFL or
213 on the computer-based TOEFL
Three letters of recommendation

How to apply: First contact us directly (matthew.bowker@nau.edu) with a statement of your research interests, and motivations for attending graduate school, with "Fire moss graduate student inquiry" in the header. Please provide a resume or C.V. and provide your GRE scores (if taken) and GPA. If we agree that you are a good match for the position, we will encourage you to formally apply to the program. We will make our final selection from those applicants.

Posted 12/4/20

Masters of Science in Biology, Western Washington University

The Biology Department at Western Washington University has openings for graduate students starting Fall 2021. Faculty members in the department offer a wide range of expertise, from molecular biology to ecology. Graduate students are eligible for teaching assistantships, which fund the majority of tuition and provide a stipend of $13,650 per academic year. WWU is located in Bellingham, WA, a coastal city north of Seattle at the base of Mt. Baker in the northwestern part of the state. We strongly advise interested students to contact potential advisors in their area of specialty to get more details about individual labs.

APPLICATION DUE DATE: Feb. 1, 2021

More information can be found with the following resources:
• The Biology Dept: https://cse.wwu.edu/biology/biology-graduate-program;
• The WWU Graduate School: http://www.wwu.edu/gradschool/App_Reqs_Deadlines.shtml;
• By contacting Dr. David Hooper, Biology Graduate Program Advisor, hooper at wwu.edu;
• By contacting the individual faculty, below.

Potential advisors

Shawn Arellano: Marine invertebrate larval ecology and deep-sea ecology. The Arellano lab has opportunities to study larval biology and larval ecology in deep-sea, methane-seep organisms as part of an NSF-funded project. Some sea-time will be required, and research training opportunities may include larval culturing and embryology, larval physiology and behavior techniques, use of oceanographic equipment, microscopy, and/or molecular ecology approaches. https://wp.wwu.edu/arellanolab/

Jim Cooper: The Cooper Evo-Devo lab focuses on aspects of development that have shaped long-term evolutionary patterns. We are particularly interested in how changes in skull morphogenesis alter the cranial mechanics of fishes in ways that allow them to invade new feeding niches. To do this we combine several different approaches that include studies of wild-caught marine fish larvae from the Salish Sea, experimental work with genetically modified zebrafish, using high-speed video to collect biomechanical data, transcriptomic studies of fish skull development, genetic mapping, and evolutionary studies of cranial form and function. Because our work is highly integrative, our lab group can accommodate students with a diverse range of interests. cooperw5@wwu.edu

Lina Dalberg: The Dahlberg Lab uses the model organism C. elegans to probe the neurobiological, cellular, and behavioral role for proteins involved in a ubiquitin-dependent processes called Endoplasmic Reticulum Associated Degradation (ERAD). Student projects will use a variety of techniques, including fluorescence microscopy, behavioral assays, and biochemical characterization to investigate how ERAD targets neural receptors for degradation. A second, NSF-funded project focuses on improving metacognitive skills in undergraduate Biology students; students interested in this project should have experience (via coursework or research) in education and pedagogy research. http://faculty.wwu.edu/dahlbec/

Deb Donovan: (Note: Prof. Donovan will not be taking new students in fall 2021). Research in the Donovan lab is focused on restoration aquaculture of our native pinto abalone, Haliotis kamtschatkana. Pinto abalone populations have declined precipitously in the last few decades and we collaborate with the Puget Sound Restoration Fund and with government agencies to restore populations in the Salish Sea. Student projects could focus on any aspect restoration, including optimizing rearing of juveniles at the hatchery, outplanting larval or juvenile abalone, or monitoring abalone at outplant sites. Students work closely with hatchery personnel to identify projects that align with student interest and that contribute meaningfully to abalone restoration. https://www.biol.wwu.edu/donovan/

Nick Galati: Cilia are evolutionarily ancient, hair-like projections that generate hydrodynamic force and process extracellular information. The goal of our lab is to understand how cells build cilia, with a specific focus on how individual proteins traffic to and from a structure at the base of cilia, called the basal body. Much like traffic cameras and GPS illuminate vehicular traffic patterns, we aim to create a spatial map of protein movement to and from cilia as they assemble and sense the environment. To do this, we combine high-resolution fluorescence microscopy with digital image analysis to detect and quantify ciliary protein trafficking in space and over time. Our analyses are primarily conducted in mammalian cells and in the protist Tetrahymena. https://biology.wwu.edu/people/galatid

David Hooper: Plant Community and Ecosystem Ecology: effects of riparian restoration on nutrient retention in mixed use watersheds. I will be accepting one graduate student in fall 2021 to work on a modeling project to understand how to better prioritize riparian restoration. Student work would combine GIS analyses and modeling of riparian buffers with field work assessing nutrient runoff to validate modeling results. This project is linked to the Nooksack Fraser Transboundary Nitrogen Project and the International Nitrogen Management System. Please see a full description of the project and desired grad student characteristics at my web site below. I strongly recommend contacting me prior to applying if you are interested in working in my lab. https://wp.wwu.edu/hooper/

Suzanne Lee: A fascinating discovery in the early 2000s was that many more regions of eukaryotic genomes are expressed than previously thought, producing a variety of RNAs whose functions, if any, are unclear. Current research in the Lee Lab is focused on understanding the biological impacts of these mysterious RNAs, with the broad goal of elucidating the underlying molecular mechanisms that govern RNA production, function, and degradation to maintain optimal cellular health. Key questions that intrigue us include: What are the molecular mechanisms that control the expression of non-protein coding and non-functional RNAs? What are the biological functions of uncharacterized non-protein coding RNAs? What happens to a cell if pathways normally responsible for processing or degrading these RNAs are disrupted? How are messenger RNAs, non-coding RNAs, and non-functional RNAs distinguished from one another? To address these and other questions, we employ the tools of biochemistry, molecular biology, bioinformatics, microscopy, cell biology, and reverse genetics, using the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila as our model organism. https://biology.wwu.edu/people/lees65

Craig Moyer: My interests are marine microbiology and geomicrobiology focusing on molecular approaches for exploring microbial diversity, community structure and ecological interactions. Presently, my lab and I are focused on the study of iron-oxidizing Zetaproteobacteria acting as the ecosystem engineers in microbial mats found at strong redox boundaries, including seep, spring and vent habitats. We are also examining the evolutionary divergence of surface and deep subsurface Zetaproteobacteria in hydrothermal systems. https://biology.wwu.edu/people/cmoyer

Brady Olson: (Note: Prof. Olson will not be taking additional students in fall 2021) Microzooplankton consume approximately 70% of marine phytoplankton primary production, making them the most significant grazers in the ocean and drivers of globally-important biogeochemical cycles. My interests are gaining understanding of the mechanisms that govern the ecology of these important zooplankton, primarily the factors that regulate their feeding behavior. http://faculty.wwu.edu/olsonm/index.html

Merrill Peterson: Insect Ecology, Evolution, and Diversity. A primary direction of potential graduate projects in my lab would involve field surveys to examine landscape-scale factors affecting the community composition of Lepidoptera (butterflies and moths) in the Pacific Northwest. Another project is to examine the temporal stability of insect hybrid zones, with a focus on a model system involving the leaf beetles, Chrysochus cobaltinus and C. auratus. Interested students are strongly encouraged to reach out to me to discuss project ideas prior to applying. https://biology.wwu.edu/people/peterson

Lynn Pillitteri: Plant Molecular and Developmental Biology. A potential graduate project in my lab would be aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms driving cell type differentiation in the model organism, Arabidopsis thaliana. https://biology.wwu.edu/people/pillitl

Dan Pollard: We study the causes of cellular trait variation. Our primary system is mating pheromone induced cell differentiation in baker's yeast. We use a broad array of techniques from genome editing to fluorescence microscopy to computer modeling. Much of our work focuses on RNA and protein metabolism. Current student projects include: (1) Molecular mechanisms of natural variation in protein production and degradation, (2) Genomic analysis of RNA interference pathway proteins (collaboration with Suzanne Lee in the department), (3) Inhibition of CRISPR Cas-9 by nucleosomes, (4) Influences of genetic and environmental variables on the kinetics of cell differentiation, and (5) Diversity and substrate specialization of yeast species in Whatcom county (outreach project w/ local middle schools). Graduate and undergraduate students typically work collaboratively in teams on projects and there are opportunities to develop new research directions. Please email me (pollard@wwu.edu) if you are interested in joining our team. https://biology.wwu.edu/people/pollard

Dietmar Schwarz: Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics and Genomics, Evolutionary Ecology. Schwarz's lab offers opportunities to study speciation, hybridization, and adaptation in host specific insects (apple maggot flies and relatives). The Schwarz lab also collaborates with Alejandro Acevedo on the molecular ecology of foraging in harbor seals. https://biology.wwu.edu/people/schward2

Anu Singh-Cundy: Plant Cell Biology and Biochemistry. We study cell-cell interactions at the physiological, cellular, and molecular levels. Current projects are focused on understanding the role of HD-AGPs, which are extracellular glycoproteins that are expressed in the transmitting tissue of the pistil and in the vasculature of roots and shoots. We also study pectins and pectin-modifying enzymes found in the pistil of solanaceous species. https://biology.wwu.edu/people/anu

Adrienne Wang: Molecular mechanisms of aging and neurodegeneration. The Wang lab is interested in understanding the molecular mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease and in identifying genetic modifiers that confer susceptibility or resistance to disease. We are especially interested in understanding how conserved signaling pathways that affect aging may interact with and mediate disease onset and progression. Current projects use fruit fly models of Alzheimer's disease and mitochondrial disease to investigate these questions using a range of genetic, pharmacologic, and molecular techniques. https://biology.wwu.edu/people/wanga5

Matthew Zinkgraf: Research in the Zinkgraf lab is focused on the ecological and evolutionary genetics of undomesticated forest trees. To accomplish this research, we apply an interdisciplinary approach that utilizes methods from computational biology, genetics/genomics, molecular biology and forest ecology. Ongoing research in the lab is concentrated around two main projects. First, creating genomic resources for Pacific Madrone (Arbutus menziesii), and apply these resources to understand patterns of genetic variation and selection. Second, investigating the genetic regulation of wood formation in Populus by understand how epigenetic modifications at specific genes can alter gene expression and regulatory networks. https://biology.wwu.edu/people/zinkgrm

Posted 11/26/20

MS Student (Oregon State University): Assessing species of greatest conservation need

The Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit is looking for an MS student to start Fall quarter 2021 (option for a Summer 2021 start date). The position is fully funded by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and will by co-advised by Drs. Jim Peterson and Melanie Davis.

MS Student: Assessing species of greatest conservation need in the Pacific Northwest

Agency: Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit (Oregon CRU), Oregon State University (OSU) Department of Fisheries and Wildlife

Location: Corvallis, OR (the traditional homelands of the Mary's River or Ampinefu Band of Kalapuya; https://asosu.oregonstate.edu/land-rec)

Salary: Approximately $1,990 per month plus benefits and tuition

Start Date: September 22, 2021

Last Date to Apply: February 28, 2021

Position Description:

The Oregon CRU at OSU is looking for a motivated MS student to start Fall Quarter 2021. The student will be co-advised by Dr. Jim Peterson and Dr. Melanie Davis and will work closely with federal and state agencies to identify species of greatest conservation need (SGCN) in the Pacific Northwest whose populations would benefit from an in-depth evaluation of existing data. The student is expected to evaluate how habitat fragmentation, degradation, and loss have negatively affected the population viability of SGCN, and to estimate the effects of potential conservation actions on these species. This position is expected to be primarily quantitative in nature with minimal field components. The student will develop skills in data management, statistics, spatial analysis, and writing reports and peer-reviewed journal articles.

Minimum Requirements:

Applicants must meet the OSU Graduate School minimum requirements for admission (found at: https://gradschool.oregonstate.edu/admissions/academic-requirements). Qualified applicants will have a bachelor’s degree in fisheries, wildlife, biology, ecology, or a related field by the expected start date. This position requires strong verbal and written communication skills, and the ability to effectively collaborate with agency stakeholders. Demonstrated commitment to justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion is imperative. The Oregon CRU and its partner agencies are dedicated to supporting the diverse needs of its students and employees. Applicants from historically excluded groups (e.g., Black, Indigenous, and People of Color, LGBTQ+, women, first-generation college students, and those from under-served communities) are strongly encouraged to apply.

Desired Skills:

The ideal candidate will have some experience analyzing data using statistical programs like R and ArcGIS. They will have a demonstrated ability to collaborate with a variety of stakeholders to achieve a common goal. Previous experience working with species of concern and/or ESA-listed species will be advantageous.

To Apply:

Please prepare a copy of your CV, unofficial transcripts, contact information for three references, and a one-page cover letter expressing your interest in the position. Please use the file naming convention: Last name_First initial_Document type for all necessary application materials. Send to Dr. Jim Peterson (jt.peterson@oregonstate.edu) and Dr. Melanie Davis (melanie.davis@oregonstate.edu) with the subject line “Species of Greatest Conservation Need MS Assistantship.” We will begin reviewing applications on February 1, 2021 and the selected applicant will be invited to apply to the OSU Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (deadline July 1, 2021).

Contact: Dr. Jim Peterson (jt.peterson@oregonstate.edu), Dr. Melanie Davis (melanie.davis@oregonstate.edu)

Posted 11/24/20

Graduate positions at UNCG

Aquatic ecology lab at UNCG (https://aterui.github.io/aquaecolab/index.html) is currently looking for one Ph.D and one Master student starting Fall 2021.

- Ph.D position
The student will work on a project investigating fish movement and demographic patterns in a small stream. The student will perform data collection in the field and develop statistical models estimating key ecological parameters, such as movement distance and survival. Also, there is a possibility of developing research projects tailored to student's interests. The project is at the interface of behavioral and population ecology, and students who are particularly interested in synthesizing these research fields are encouraged to apply.

- MS position
The student will work on the statistical modeling of discharge variation in relation to land use and geometries of river networks. The project leverages the public database of discharge and land use. This is part of the project exploring drivers of food chain length in rivers and the student is expected to work collaboratively with current lab members. The student is expected to have a solid understanding of ecology, environmental science, hydrology, or related fields. Advanced skills in R and GIS are a big plus.

If interested in either of the above positions, please contact me (a_terui at uncg.edu) with (1) your CV, (2) a one-page research statement describing your previous research experiences and interests, and (3) the names and contacts of three referees. Review of applications begins immediately. The departmental deadline for submitting the application to the graduate studies is January 15, 2021 for Ph.D and April 1, 2021 for MS. If the student is accepted into the graduate program, there is a possibility for financial support in the form of teaching or research assistantships. For details, please visit https://biology.uncg.edu/graduate/apply/

Akira Terui
Department of Biology
University of North Carolina Greensboro

Posted 11/24/20

Masters in Environmental Science at Villanova University

The Villanova University Master of Science in Environmental Science (MSES) program is accepting applications for Fall 2021. The program emphasizes integrated thinking and learning at the nexus of science, policy, and society. Our graduates will see beyond linear and fragmented approaches to solving environmental problems and understand the complex interactions between people and the environment. Students may elect either a thesis or non-thesis (capstone or portfolio) option that can be completed full-time or part-time. We offer specialty tracks in Ecosystem Sciences, Resource Management, and Geospatial Sciences that prepare graduates to be competitive in multiple career paths. The MSES faculty includes professors with expertise in several academic disciplines and a range of scholarly interests that span geography, biology, chemistry, and geology. Research undertaken by faculty and MSES students spans these disciplines (see https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/artsci/geoenv/academicprograms/graduate_programs/ResearchAreas.html for more information about ongoing research). For more information about the MSES program, and to apply, see the program website (https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/artsci/geoenv/academicprograms/graduate_programs.html) or contact the Graduate Program Director, Dr. Keith Henderson (keith.henderson@villanova.edu). Prospective students are also encouraged to contact potential research mentors directly. To be considered for graduate assistantships (including tuition and stipend), applications must be received by February 1. Apply here: https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/artsci/graduate/graduate-programs/environmental-science.html

Posted 11/20/20

Gilbert Foundation Research Assistantships
School of Renewable Natural Resources, Louisiana State University

The School of Renewable Natural Resources is seeking M.S. and Ph.D. applicants for Gilbert Foundation Graduate Research Assistantships. These assistantships are available to students concentrating in the study of forestry and closely related areas.  Research areas could include forest management and economics, wood science and technology, forest biometrics, silviculture, forest hydrology, ecophysiology, forest genetics, and forestry-related wildlife and fisheries management and conservation.

Annual stipends are generous and include a full waiver of tuition and student fees.

To be eligible, M.S. degree applicants must have an undergraduate GPA of 3.0 overall and 3.25 for last two years. Ph.D. applicants must a have a cumulative graduate GPA of 3.6. Verbal and quantitative scores of the GRE should be at least 310 with at least 153 and 144 on the verbal and quantitative sections, respectively. The writing score must be at least a 4.0. Selection criteria also include  evidence of the applicant’s potential success in pursuing a graduate degree and representation of the Gilbert Foundation ideals, as detailed in a letter of application (see below).

For more information about graduate studies in the School of Renewable Natural Resources, visit the School’s web page (http://www.rnr.lsu.edu) and the Graduate School web page (http://gradlsu.gs.lsu.edu/).

The School of Renewable Natural Resources has a teaching, research, and extension faculty of 30, which includes adjunct professors of the US Geological Survey’s Louisiana Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. Louisiana State University is a comprehensive Research I institution enrolling more than 30,000 students. The campus is in south Louisiana, 60 minutes from New Orleans, close to Louisiana’s Cajun country, and in the heart of the state’s abundant forestry, wildlife, and fisheries resources.

The most successful applicants have arranged for a faculty advisor prior to submitting their application.

To apply, submit a CV, copies of academic transcripts, GRE scores, and a letter of interest that includes (1) research interests and faculty member contacted, (2) names and email address for at least two references. Deadline for receipt of materials is February 15, 2021. Awardees will then apply for admission for the Fall 2021 semester with a separate application to the Graduate School.

Send application materials via email to

Dr. Thomas Dean
Professor and Gilbert Committee Chair                         
fwdean@lsu.edu
(225) 578-4216

Thomas J. Dean, Ph.D.
Professor, Quantitative Silviculture and Forest Ecology
School of Renewable Natural Resources
Louisiana State University
210 RNR Bldg, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
office 225-578-4216 | mobile 225-328-0930 | fax 225-578-4227
fwdean@lsu.edu | lsu.edu
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Thomas_Dean3

Posted 11/19/20

Recruiting Two MS, Environmental Science Graduate Students

Dr Alia Khan is recruiting for Two MS positions in Aquatic Biogeochemistry of the Cryosphere available for Fall 2021 in the Department of Environmental Sciences at Western Washington University.

These positions will come with two academic years of support as a teaching and/or research assistant within the Department of Environmental Sciences. Research projects will involve local fieldwork at Mt. Baker and the North Cascade Mountains, as well as analytical laboratory work for biogeochemical analyses. One position will focus on a NASA funded project to quantify impacts of deposition of black carbon on Arctic sea ice. The second position will focus on quantifying impacts of snow algae on snow and ice albedo in the Pacific Northwest.

How to Apply: Applications to the Department of Environmental Science at WWU are due February 1st, 2021: https://huxley.wwu.edu/graduate-application-information. For these positions, please send a CV and statement of interest to: alia.khan@wwu.edu. To be formally accepted, a full application must be submitted by the deadline, with a note of interest to this position.

Ed Weber
Graduate/Internship Program Specialist
Huxley College of the Environment, MS9079
Western Washington University, ES 545
OFFICE:   (360) 650-3646
FAX:   (360) 650-2842
https://huxley.wwu.edu/graduate-programs
calendly.com/huxley-grad-program-advisor
https://www.facebook.com/HuxleyGradProgram

Posted 11/18/20

Seeking Graduate Student for River Water Quality Project

I am seeking one motivated student to complete a master's degree with a thesis in the Department of Geography at Miami University (Ohio). The project is supported by NSF's LTREB program. Details about the project are available at the link below. The interested student would focus on the stream component of the study and examine how land use and climate change impact water quality within agriculturally dominated watersheds. The deadline to apply is Feb 1st.
-Project Details: https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1930655&HistoricalAwards=false

-This interdisciplinary project will be completed in close collaboration with Dr. Michael Vanni and Dr. Maria Gonzalez at Miami University.

- The student will work within the newly renovated Water Resources Lab (overseen by Dr. Grudzinski) and Center for Aquatic and Watershed Science at Miami University.

-The Water Resources Lab has interdisciplinary collaboration established with various departments at Miami University including numerous faculty and staff affiliated with the Center for Aquatic and Watershed Science. See: http://miamioh.edu/cas/academics/centers/caws/ for additional details.

-The Geography Department at Miami University provides competitive prospective graduate students with two years of funding in the form of teaching assistantships if making good progress. Student travel assistance is also provided to present research at local, regional, and national conferences. For more information about the Department of Geography at Miami University please visit: https://miamioh.edu/cas/academics/departments/geography/

-Degree: Master of Arts in Geography

-Application Deadline: February 1st 2021

-For additional information please contact Dr. Bartosz Grudzinski at grudzibp@maimioh.edu. Recent research is available at https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=ea6rAccAAAAJ&hl=en

Posted 11/14/20

11 Graduate Positions at 7 institution on Aquatic Intermittency effects on Microbiomes in Streams

The Aquatic Intermittency effects on Microbiomes in Streams (AIMS) team is seeking enthusiastic, qualified, diverse applicants for 11 graduate student positions across seven different institutions. Students will join a collaborative team of scientists focused on understanding the role of microbiomes and stream intermittency in controlling downstream water quality in the Mountain West, Great Plains, and Southeastern Forest ecosystems. All students will take a cross-institutional Team Science and Collaboration course in their first year, receive support for data science instructor training through The Carpentries Foundation, have opportunities to mentor undergraduate research projects, and will work with an amazing team of scientists (see below). Dr. Amy Burgin at the University of Kansas is the overall contact point for the project; if you have questions about the benefits of working on the AIMS project or how the project will be coordinated, please feel free to contact her at burginam@ku.edu. AIMS is funded by an NSF-EPSCoR Track 2 Collaborative grant, a press release also provides additional details. If interested in joining AIMS, email the contact person listed at a given institution. Please include your CV and short introduction to your research experience and interests.

Institution: University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS; 1 Position
Mentor & Contact: Dr. Colin Jackson (cjackson@olemiss.edu)
Master’s/Ph.D. or either: Ph.D.
Academic Unit(s): Department of Biology
Application Deadline: 1 Feb 2021
Application components: Application, Statement of Purpose, 2 Letters of Recommendation, Transcripts, GRE, TOEFL or IELTS for international students
Skills/Interests/Experience: Microbial Ecology
Website for more info: https://biology.olemiss.edu/graduate/

Institution: University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, Mississippi; 1 Position
Mentor & Contact: Dr. Kevin A. Kuehn (kevin.kuehn@usm.edu)
Master’s/Ph.D. or either: Ph.D.
Academic Unit(s): Biological, Environmental, and Earth Sciences (BEES)
Application Deadline: Fall admission – February 15th, Spring admission – October 15th Application components: 3 Letters of Recommendation, Personal Statement, CV, Transcripts, and scores from the verbal and quantitative tests of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), and TOEFL for international students.
Skills/Interest/Experience: A Master’s degree in biology, microbiology, ecology, or closely related field is required. Applicants having prior experience in molecular techniques for determining microbial community structure would be considered a plus.
Websites for more information:
Kevin A. Kuehn: (http://www.usm.edu/faculty-directory/profile.php?id=1936667)
            BEES: https://www.usm.edu/graduate-programs/biological-sciences.php
            USM: https://www.usm.edu/graduate-admissions/index.php

Posted 10/30/20

Masters in Environmental Science at Villanova University

The Villanova University Master of Science in Environmental Science (MSES) program is accepting applications for Fall 2021. The program emphasizes integrated thinking and learning at the nexus of science, policy, and society. Our graduates will see beyond linear and fragmented approaches to solving environmental problems and understand the complex interactions between people and the environment. Students may elect either a thesis or non-thesis (capstone or portfolio) option that can be completed full-time or part-time. We offer specialty tracks in Ecosystem Sciences, Resource Management, and Geospatial Sciences that prepare graduates to be competitive in multiple career paths. The MSES faculty includes professors with expertise in several academic disciplines and a range of scholarly interests that span geography, biology, chemistry, and geology. Research undertaken by faculty and MSES students spans these disciplines (see https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/artsci/geoenv/academicprograms/graduate_programs/ResearchAreas.html for more information about ongoing research). For more information about the MSES program, and to apply, see the program website (https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/artsci/geoenv/academicprograms/graduate_programs.html) or contact the Graduate Program Director, Dr. Keith Henderson (keith.henderson@villanova.edu). Prospective students are also encouraged to contact potential research mentors directly. To be considered for graduate assistantships (including tuition and stipend), applications must be received by February 1. Apply here: https://www1.villanova.edu/villanova/artsci/graduate/graduate-programs/environmental-science.html

Posted 10/17/20

Graduate Opportunity: Community Ecology

The Swan Lab at UMBC (biodiversity.umbc.edu) is currently recruiting a PhD student to start in Fall 2021.  Research interests are generally open, but should align with the lab’s historically diverse interests in research on the application of theory on how local vs regional effects explain species coexistence in built (plants) and non-built (streams and rivers) environments. Survey, experimental and synthesis approaches are welcome. As the student will be expected to develop their own project, a Master’s degree is desirable in biology or ecology.

If interested, please send an email cover letter describing research interests, career goals, any related experience, a current CV; unofficial academic transcript; and, the name and full contact information for three references to Dr. Christopher M. Swan (chris.swan@umbc.edu). Review of applications will be rolling until the University’s official deadline to apply at the end of January 2021.

Christopher M. Swan, Ph.D.
Professor
Dept. of Geography & Environmental Systems
University of Maryland, Baltimore County
216 Interdisciplinary Life Sciences Building
1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250 USA
http://biodiversity.umbc.edu
http://orcid.org/0000-0002-9763-9630
http://scholar.google.com/citations?user=NNfHt5YAAAAJ
1.410.455.3957

Posted 9/18/20

Masters Assistantship Examining Perspectives on Forest Adaptation and Restoration Strategies at the University of Vermont

Project: The University of Vermont, Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources is seeking a MS-level graduate student to participate in research examining forest stakeholder perspectives on restoration, adaptation, and transition management techniques at fostering forest health and productivity in the face of novel climate, insect, and disease threats. This research will use survey analysis and focus group data to assess perspectives on ecological change and adaptive management in both urban and rural forest settings. The student will join a team of collaborators from the University of Vermont, the University of Maine, the U.S. Forest Service Northern Research Station and Northern Institute of Applied Climate Science, and Northeast Climate Adaptation Science Center in assessing likely adoption of management options to promote diverse and productive rural and urban forests considering the stress of climate change and other disturbance agents. The position is available for Summer/Fall 2021 and includes two guaranteed years of funding (stipend, tuition waiver, and health insurance).

Qualifications: B.S. in forest ecology, forestry, silviculture, biology or a closely related field.  Applicants should be able to work independently, but also cooperatively with other researchers and managers on the larger project. Applicants should also have a strong work ethic, demonstrated writing and research capabilities, and a record of leadership.

Application: Interested applicants should supply all application materials to the UVM Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources (RSENR) Program (MS in Natural Resources) by February 1, 2021 – when applying, please state your interest in this position in the "Statement of Purpose."


Contact: Dr. Anthony D’Amato (awdamato@uvm.edu, 802-656-8030)

Anthony D'Amato
Professor and Director
Forestry Program
Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources
University of Vermont
204E Aiken Center
Burlington, VT 05405
Phone: (802) 656-8030
FAX:   (802) 656-8683
Email: awdamato@uvm.edu
Website: http://www.uvm.edu/rsenr/tonydamato/

Posted 9/16/20

GRADUATE OPPORTUNITIES IN ECOLOGY AND EVOLUTIONARY BIOLOGY

The Graduate Program in Ecology and Evolution at Stony Brook University is recruiting doctoral and master's level graduate students for Fall 2021.

The department has a long and distinguished history, being one of the first of its kind in the US. It currently has a productive and diverse faculty working on a broad array of questions involving humans and primates, microbes, plants, vertebrate and invertebrate animals and whole ecosystems. Field locales span the globe from the old and new world tropics to the Arctic and Antarctic polar regions, as well as the uplands, wetlands and coastal areas of Long Island and nearby New York City. Being within a train ride to New York City, Stony Brook is a diverse campus, and we are implementing programs to build an even more diverse program in the future.

Upon admission, PhD students are guaranteed teaching assistantships, with additional support available through fellowships and research assistantships, as they become available. The deadlines for applications are Dec. 1, 2020 for the PhD program. The preferred deadline for the MA program is January 15, 2021, but applications are considered on a rolling basis until April 15, 2021. GREs are not required for applications to Stony Brook University as of this year. Application fees may be forgiven for applicants that meet specific guidelines. Please contact us for more information.

Below is a listing of current local program faculty to whom questions can be directed. It is highly recommended that PhD applicants contact faculty and identify potential advisors before submitting an application. Faculty are more than willing to entertain questions about the program generally and about their own labs and research. Not all will be taking students, but they will all gladly discuss what the program and the locale. For questions or assistance with the application process please e-mail our Graduate Program Coordinator, Melissa Cohen melissa.j.cohen@stonybrook.edu. More information can be found at https://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/ecoevo/_program/application.php

DEPARTMENTAL FACULTY

H. Resit Akcakaya - Population and conservation ecology
http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/ee/akcakayalab/

Stephen B. Baines - Ecosystem ecology and biogeochemistry
http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/ee/baineslab/

Rafael D'Andrea - Community and Theoretical Ecology
https://sites.google.com/view/rafaeldandrea/home

Liliana M. Dávalos - Vertebrate phylogenetics, biogeography and conservation
http://lmdavalos.net/lab/The_Lab.html

Walter F. Eanes - Evolutionary genetics of Drosophila
http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/ee/eaneslab/

Jessica Gurevitch - Research synthesis, plant population and invasion ecology
https://gurevitchlab.weebly.com/

Jesse D. Hollister - Plant evolutionary genomics and epigenetics
https://genomeevolution.wordpress.com/

Jeffrey S. Levinton - Marine ecology and paleobiology
http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/marinebio/levinton.main.html

Heather J. Lynch - Quantitative ecology and conservation biology
https://lynchlab.com/

Ross H. Nehm - Science education, evolution education, cognition
https://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/ecoevo/people/faculty_pages/nehm.html

Dianna K. Padilla - Marine and freshwater ecology, conservation and invasion biology
http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/ee/padillalab/

Joshua Rest - Evolutionary genomics
http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/ee/restlab/Home.html

Tara M. Smiley - Paleoecology and biogeography
https://www.tarasmiley.com

Pascal Title - macroevolution and spatial macroecology
https://www.pascaltitle.com

Robert W. Thacker- Systematics, phylogenetics, and ecology
https://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/ecoevo/people/faculty_pages/thacker.html

John R. True - Evolutionary developmental biology
https://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/ecoevo/people/faculty_pages/true.html

Krishna M. Veeramah - Primate comparative genomics
http://life.bio.sunysb.edu/ee/veeramahlab/

Natasha Vitek-Vertebrate paleontology, evolution, scaling of variation
http://www.nsvitek.com/home

PROGRAM FACULTY IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS

Jackie Collier - Microbial ecology
https://you.stonybrook.edu/collierlab/

Christopher Gobler - Coastal Ecology and Conservation
https://you.stonybrook.edu/goblerlab/

Andreas Koenig - Behavioral ecology of primates
https://sites.google.com/a/stonybrook.edu/idpas_faculty_profile_koenig/

David Q. Matus - Evolution of Cell Invasion
https://you.stonybrook.edu/matuslab/

Catherine Markham - Behavioral ecology
https://catherinemarkham.com/

Bradley Petersen - Marine Community Ecology
https://you.stonybrook.edu/theawesomepeterson/

Alistair Rogers - Plant Physiology and Climate Change
www.bnl.gov/TEST

Shawn P. Serbin - Plant Physiology and Remote Sensing
www.bnl.gov/TEST

Jeroen B. Smaers - Brain Evolution, Phylogenetic Comparative Methodology, Macroevolutionary Morphology
https://smaerslab.com/

Leslie Thorne - Ecology and Behavior of Marine Birds and Mammals
https://you.stonybrook.edu/thornelab/

Nils Volkenborn - Benthic Ecology and Sediment Biogeochemistry
https://you.stonybrook.edu/voll/

Patricia Wright - Tropical Conservation and Primatology
https://www.patwrightlab.net/pat-wright.html

Posted 9/15/20

Graduate Position: UNCW Vertebrate Neuroecology

The Schweikert Lab at the University of North Carolina Wilmington is recruiting a graduate student to join the 'Evolutionary Neuroecology' group in the Department of Biology and Marine Biology (BMB) in the Fall of 2021. The available position is for the Master's program, with possible advancement to PhD. The lab primarily studies the neuroecology of marine vertebrate vision, centering on topics that include the sensory basis of dynamic skin color change, deep-sea bioluminescence, and the visual ecology of gamefish and whales. Project selection is flexible, as the student will be encouraged to develop an independent research idea that aligns with lab interests.

Students can learn more about the lab research program here: https://schweikertlab.com

Research in the Schweikert Lab is integrative, and students with interest in developing molecular, histological, and computational skills are encouraged to apply. The early application deadline is Feb 15th 2021, with the application period extending to June 30th 2021. Prior to applying, interested students are strongly encouraged to contact Dr. Lorian Schweikert directly. Please send an email to schweikertl@uncw.edu containing (1) a detailed curriculum vitae that includes your GPA and GRE scores (if available) and (2) a letter of interest outlining your rationale for pursuing a graduate degree, your career goals, and your motivation for applying to the Evolutionary Neuroecology lab.

Lorian Schweikert
Assistant Professor
Department of Biology and Marine Biology
University of North Carolina Wilmington

Posted 9/14/20

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